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9 Volt battery powered heating element that is small and can reaches 380 degrees F

I would like the heating element along with the battery to fit into an Altoids tin. I have copper wire (.064 gage), nichrome wire (low gage), stainless steel wire (.064 gage), 304 stainless steel wire mesh, and many tools including a soldering iron. I would be willing to use a smaller battery as well which would be even better. Ideally it would be able to power a LED light as well. Hope you guys can help, feel free to email me if there are any further questions.  

frollard1 year ago
It's a double edged sword -- hook the wire up in series to the battery. 

It is a linear resistor. longer = more ohms resistance.
The longer the wire, the less current will flow.
The shorter the wire, the more current will flow.
The more current flows = the hotter the wire.

The shorter the wire, the more energy is dissipated, the hotter it will get, BUT, the hotter it gets, the more heat it will dissipate to the air (heat transfer is a function of the difference between the hot and cold side).  Yay thermodynamics.  If it were a vacuum, only the radiated energy would cool the metal and it would get VERY hot, but because it's in air, it conducts and convects heat away, until it reaches an equilibrium of energy in = energy out.  THAT equilibrium point is the temperature a given piece of wire will be at; there are really about 6 variables here at play;
  • electrical length of wire (resistance)
  • specs of wire (resistance per length, thermal mass)
  • voltage
  • current (related to the above because of ohms law)
  • air temperature, pressure, humidity
If you plan to use this as a soldering iron or the like, it will be terrible, because while it will get HOT, because it has low thermal mass, it won't be able to heat OTHER things very much (A watt or two of power max, because 9v batteries are terrible).

As iceng says below (above?) without temperature feedback and a circuit controlling the current into the wire, it will be 'as hot as it can'.  hotter does not necessarily mean more total energy.
butlerhs (author)  frollard1 year ago
I do not intend to use it as a soldering iron. I want the wire to heat up to about 380 Degrees F for short periods of times. I have a momentary button and will only be pressed for short periods of times. That is a very helpful description, Thank you so much! Below I listed the more specific wires. So any chance you could tell me length of wire to use and I am not set on a 9V battery, what battery would you suggest?
Right, but what I'm getting at is the ability to get up to x degrees is easy when you're only heating a tiny element.

Let me reiterate - WHAT do you want it to do?
i.e. If you want a computer don't say you want a thing with circuits.
butlerhs (author)  frollard1 year ago
I am trying to make a heating element to heat pipe tobacco just enough to get the vapor. I will be using it in an insulated altoids tin.
yes...tobacco...right :)

No reason it won't work, I'd go with 3xAA or AAA batteries -- cheaper and you'll get better run time.

There isn't much mass to vaporizable materials, so that won't be a problem, it's just a matter of getting the right current for the right temperature, and the easy way is to just MAKE one and see how hot it gets, then adjust.
butlerhs (author)  frollard1 year ago
Perfect advice! Thank you, my main problem was using the 9V battery, could you explain why that is? The same circuit would not heat when using 9V but would when using just one AA.
because a 9v battery is garbage at producing current.
iceng frollard1 year ago
+1
iceng iceng1 year ago
Sorry you cannot solder the nichrom wire, it night get hot enough to
self disconnect.

You need to use mechanical split screws to attach the nichrome wire
to connect to copper lead in wires .

Fiber screw downs will not work unless they are high temperature;

A
rickharris1 year ago
Check the spec of your battery - Most 9 volt square batteries PP3 do not have a large current supply capability.

i.e. it will go flat very quickly.
iceng1 year ago
How do you plan to measure the nichrome wire temperature.

Some measuring TC ( Thermos-Couples ) will cool your wire before
it can reach temperature.

What I can't tell you is how long to make the wire to get the temperature.
I would need the resistance per foot and the exact kind of wire.

Use a remote optical IR temp measure tool under $40

A
butlerhs (author)  iceng1 year ago
The wire I am using is "High-Temperature Nickel Wire, .010" Diameter"
Not sure what TC is, but I will look into what that means.
I have an infrared thermometer, which I am pretty sure that is what you are referencing?
Thank you for your quick response.
Let me know if there is any further information you need to help!
iceng iceng1 year ago
BTW yes an LED with a series resistor can be lighted at the same time.
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