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Anyone have any high-quality machining techniques that can be used in a low-tech situation?

I want to make a CNC machine but I don't have the tools or access to tools that I'd like to make one,  all I have is a simple drill press, a little stand-alone vice that I can use on it, calipers, and micrometers. What I want to know is how can I, limited tools only (I hope), precisely drill (and possibly tap, I do have a tap set) a bunch of holes in aluminium angle/channel, acrylic, and MDF?

rickharris6 years ago
Your marking out should be done with a fine scribe and if necessary marking fluid.

May model engineers will use a magnifying glass to ensure they have the punch on the crossing lines. If you scribe the lines and the centre punch is sharp you can feel where they cross.

Check your drills are good quality so they actually drill the right sized hole.

Everything else is taking care. IF your drilling big holes start with a small hole to locate the larger drill.

You don't specify what you mean by "holes are off" but check your drill press to make sure its vertical and the drill platform is at 90 deg to the drill.

This site

http://www.homemodelenginemachinist.com/index.php?PHPSESSID=cc74e346811bb27ae94fc2fe4a66949c&

is full of helpful information for the budding metal worker.

rickharris6 years ago
You have a drill press, you can hand tap the holes although I tend to start the tap BY HAND ONLY in the drill press to make sure the tap is vertical.

Make, from a nail, a centre punch to mark your drill point with.

After hat it's all just about accuracy of marking out.
The Ideanator (author)  rickharris6 years ago
i do have a box of centre punches but my holes are always off.
when you sharpened them, you were sure they were conical, not lopsided?