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Books similar to Make: Tools by Charles Platt?

I'm looking for books that are similar to Make: Tools by Charles Platt. It focuses on building skills around hand tools, starting with basic sawing and gluing wood and working through more advanced sawing, drilling, staining and finishing, basic joinery, and working with ABS. 

I've looked at the other books published by Maker Media, but nothing really compares to the kinds of hands on learning and skill building. 

rickharris21 days ago

Your library should be able to help you, just ask.

However as a DT (shop) teacher I would suggest the important things are:

Learn to mark out correctly.

Learn to draw out what you want to do so you can work out most of the problems BEFORE you start to make saw dust or metal filings.

Learn to hand saw in a straight line, NOTHING can replace practice at this although I would recommend you point your first finger forwards as you saw this helps keep the saw stiff.

Learn to file so you get a flat surface. Again this is about practice. Also pay attention to your marks so your accurate.

Always cut on the waste side of your marked line and use some finishing tool to get to the line.The start trying the fit.

Learn to sharpen your tools. NEVER cut towards your hands or fingers. A slip HURTS and may be a trip to hospital (don't ask how I know but I have the scars to prove being careless hurts).

Look at you tube there is a wealth of project and DIY skills demonstrated there

https://www.youtube.com/user/Matthiaswandel/videos

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3_AWXcf2K3l9ILVu...

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC4PI8VEr1ZaKn4TBc...

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiEk4xHBbz0hZNIBB...

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjA8vRlL1c7BDixQR...

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5NO8MgTQKHAWXp6z...

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9zTuyWffK9ckEz12...

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=DIY+s...

Kiteman22 days ago

In my experience, those are the sorts of skill best learned in person - without knowing anything about you at all, I would say find a human being who will let you play with their tools and keep a weather eye on you to provide hints & tips.

If you're young enough, talk to the "shop" teachers at your school, or knock on the door of a neighbour with a well-equipped shed and ask for the benefits of their wisdom (I learned some interesting tips from a retired gentleman who lives a couple of hundred yards up my street, turned out he was an engineer before he retired).