Can any one tell me 0.218k ohms or 0.220k ohms = how many ohms and the color code of the resistor?

Can any one tell me what is the color code for 0.220k or 0.218k resistor

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First of all it is 220 ohm or 220 Ω and 218 ohm or 218 Ω.

220 Ω is red, red, brown, and gold or silver bands.

218 Ω is red, brown, grey, and gold or silver bands.

Here is a basic code book.

Sorry 218 ohm is red, brown, grey, black, and a gold or silver bands.

Soumojit (author)  Josehf Murchison2 years ago

But tell me that is .220k ohms = only 220 ohms ??? I don't think soooo!!!!!


https://www.instructables.com/id/Glow-leds-using-AC-current220-250V/

see this instractable I want to make this project. Just tell me that what is the value of resistor used in this project? and 220 ohm resistor is small in size but the site tells that .220k ohms resistor is big in size and the picture tell the same thing also!

I know 0.220 kΩ is 220Ω however you are
free to believe whatever you want.

By the way the 220Ω resistor is a 1 watt the other resistor is a 1/4 watt that is why the difference in size.

If you look at the pics in the Instructasble
you posted it looks more like orange, orange, brown, and silver and that is 330
Ω the other resistor looks brown, black, green, scuffed, and gold without a
better pic I would say it is a 100 mΩ not 1000 mΩ unless it is a 6 band
resistor making it a 105 Ω brown, black, green, black, and gold.

Read the color
codes in the PDF files I posted or Google color codes for yourself. But please
don’t ask for help and then spit in the face of the person trying to help you.

Its a 1 MEGAOhm, not a 1 milliohm. That whole instructable looks like it was written up by someone without the experience to know what they are doing.

Twice in a row I messed up the second resistor but the one resistor in the Instructable looks like orange and not red making it a 330 ohm.

Don't you just love it when they ask for help and then tell you, "You are wrong".

"I don't have a clue about the subject, so I need to ask you a question, but your answer is wrong"

Yeah. Ticks me off too.

+1 certainly is 220 R !

That's what you asked for. and 0.220K is indeed 220 Ohms.

You can check the links to the right...
Ask Google for a Resistor color chart or online calculator...
Of course there is always the library that should have such information available - just so I can say I know libraries ;)

Soumojit (author)  Downunder35m2 years ago

But tell me that is .220k ohms = only 220 ohms ??? I don't think soooo!!!!!

https://www.instructables.com/id/Glow-leds-using-AC-current220-250V/

see this instractable I want to make this project. Just tell me that what is the value of resistor used in this project? and 220 ohm resistor is small in size but the site tells that .220k ohms resistor is big in size and the picture tell the same thing also!

If you go to the store and by two 1/4watt resistors , one being a 100ohm and the other being a 1Mohm resistor you would find them to the same physical size. Only the colored bands would be different. If you then purchased a 1watt 100ohm resistor and a 1/4 watt 100 ohm resistor both resistors would have the same color bands but one would physically be about 4 tmes larger. The physical size of a resistor is strongly affected by the wattage not the resistance.

The resistors in the pictures you mentioned are salvaged from some old equipment. One looks to be a 1/4 watt while the other appears to be a 1/2watt. Take a look at the two capacitors in the photo. The red one is the 250V polyfilm capacitor (he doesn't list the size but it is probably picofarad size range (again salvaged). The orange capacitor on the other hand is a 50V 100ufarad capacitor. The orange one has a substantially larger farad size but is physically smaller due to it's lower voltage rating.

You obviously neither know math nor resistors - are you sure you want to do this project?
Like with rocks, a kilo is 1000grams - so a kilo ohm is not a 1000grams but 1000 ohm.
This is a fact, wether you like it or not.
Most women tell you size does not matter when in fact it does!
If you judge a resistor by it's outside dimensions to get the value you fail to undestand electronics.
You won't be able to see the printed value on a 0201 SMD resistor with your naked eye, so I guess you simply claim it would not be a resistor at all?
Resistors are available in many forms and shapes, the more power they can handle the bigger they get.
Take a 1000Ohm breaking resistor for a motor controller of 2.5kW and you load of bread will lokk tiny in comparison.


I strongly suggest that you don't build ANY circuit that needs more than 24V to work as you lack basic understanding required for it.
Electrical safety comes first and mains voltages is not to mess with.

Certainly is 220 ohms (220R) (retired electronics engineer)