Can someone give me a picture of a home-cast aluminum ingot and tell me how many pop cans it took to make it?

I am trying to get an Idea of how many pop cans I need for a project and have no perspective of how many it will take.

sort by: active | newest | oldest
There are a couple cans in there but mosty a razor scooter, if your gonna use cans sut the tops and bottoms off and use those first and you should really only use cans after you have a nice amount of molten aluminum already in your crucible.
DSCF3210.JPGDSCF3211.JPG
robotguy48 years ago
Try asking this guy (actually, read a bit through the comments here. You might find your answer):
https://www.instructables.com/id/Ultimate-Guide-to-Making-a-Cheap-but-Effective-Alu
FCDV9CKF9N26RTZ.MEDIUM.jpg
For some reason people get fixated on using cans as a source of aluminum. Trashbins have all sorts of aluminum stuff in them that can be melted down with a better return, and probably better aluminum. As mentioned before you lose a lot of material from oxidation and dross. One throwaway bike has quite a bit of aluminum that can be scavanged (as well as a host of other useful bits), as do appliances or other refuse. To make anything meaningful from pop-cans, you gotta drink a lot of red-bull. I prefer tea. -Shlep
kelseymh8 years ago
According to Wikipedia, current cans have a mass of 15g (half an ounce). That took all of six seconds to find, including scrolling through the article.

Since you won't get any significant evaporative losses when you melt them, you just need to know how much material (in grams) you need for your project, and divide by 15. Or know the material in ounces and multiply by two. Your choice.
Unfortunately, about half (rough estimate) of the can is lost to oxides because of the large surface area and difficulty in getting all the aluminum away from the dross. So the conversions are closer to 4 cans per oz or 8 grams each : )