Can you "Daisy Chain" resistors?

Can you chain together multiple resistors to add up their ohms into a larger amount.

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rickharris7 years ago
 www.electronics2000.co.uk/calc/series-parallel-resistor-calculator.php is an online resistance calculator for series and parallel.
seandogue7 years ago
 Yes. This is what we can a "series" connection in electronics, when they (resistors, capacitors, or whatever) are linked end to end.
cvianna17 years ago
Yes you can but you also have to be careful of the amount of power you are pumping through them. Resistance x current = heat.
Resistance X Current2 = heat
Yes.  Resistances add, for resistances wired in series.  For resistors wired in parallel, conductances add, where "conductance" is the inverse of resistance. 
( Γ = 1/R)
See:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resistor#Series_and_parallel_resistors

Example:  A 220 ohm resistor and a 470 ohm resistor are wired in series.  The combined resistance of these is 220+470 = 690 ohm.

Suppose these same resistors are wired in parallel. The combined resistance will then be 1/ (1/220 + 1/470) = 149.86 ohm

Bigev7 years ago
Yes. It is called putting them in series. (see fig. 1) And the resistive values add together. A + B + C
fig. 1)  - - -      (one minus sign = one resistor)

There is another configuration called parallel(see fig. 2) and the resistive values add inversely. 1/A + 1/B + 1/C
fig. 2) -
           -
           -

Additionally, there are more rules to deal with when it comes to power dissipation, amperage handling and such.