Connecting soft circuit sensors to a sound system?

I want to make a sensor that will cause a sound system to emit music. There are some 'ibles for making soft-circuit sensors, but I want to make it so that a speaker produces sounds when an object triggers a sensor. When somebody stands on this sensor, sound will come from a speaker. I don't have any experience with electronics but I can learn.

Sorry if my explanation is repetitive.

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How many different sounds, and what quality were you thinking of ?
Psypomp (author)  steveastrouk5 years ago
I want to connect each sensor to an mp3 device that plays one sound on a loop. I have some recordings of industrial/conceptual sounds. This would require a speaker system for each one-- one problem is that the sensor requires less energy than the speakers.
How many units ? Can you use mains power ?
Use some Nuvoton ISD speech chips - they'll store music as well. They take very little current and have their own amps built in. Sound quality won't be hi-fi, but then, if you are playing it quietly, I don't think anyone will know.

Steve
canucksgirl5 years ago
Here's a good instructable that shows you how to create a pressure plate. You can then wire it to your sound source. As the author explains, the concept can be used to trigger a variety of actions, depending on what you want.

If you need more help, just ask. :)
Psypomp (author)  canucksgirl5 years ago
You are angelic. Yes, this could be modified for my purposes. I would just have to figure out how to connect the plates to a battery-powered speaker system with an audio loop.
iceng Psypomp5 years ago
Nice hands, they should be able to make a wire connection between your radio and it's speaker.

A
LOL... Thanks, I haven't been called angelic here yet. ;)

Give the instructable a try and see if you can connect it to your sound system. If you still need more help, you can always post a reply here.
iceng5 years ago
The easy answer is a small micro processor responding to a change
on the circuit sensor and play a simple digital tune to a mini speaker,
everything running off a 9V battery.

But you would not ask this question if you could program, so the next
approach is a transistor responding to your sensor and closing a mini
relay which switches your HiFi  to a small speaker for the duration
of  the standing mark.

A
Psypomp (author)  iceng5 years ago
I like the microprocessor idea. I was thinking of using an Arduino (which my Ubuntu doesn't support well) or some other microcontroller. But the truth is, I am a total newbie. I will look further into this. Thanks!