Instructables

DIY Stereoscopic Eyepiece?

Made a night vision spotting scope from a rather large cascade tube and I'm wishing for a way to get the same image in both eyes like binoculars. Is this possible to do with DIY parts and off the shelf optics? The phosphor screen (what needs to be magnified into the eye) is 34mm in dia and has a clear picture without an eyepiece, but an eyepiece will magnify it for easier usage. I was wondering if anyone out there had a solution for something like this. I think I can get access to surplus prisms and mirrors if necessary, but I have no idea what I would need.

Picture of DIY Stereoscopic Eyepiece?
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iceng1 year ago
use a split prism.
Here's a link to a DIY stereo microscope . Very detailed plans.

http://www.funsci.com/fun3_en/uzoom/uzoom.htm
eyebot117 (author)  RavensCraft1 year ago
I did find a stereoscopic microscope head for a decent price, but I'm not for sure it would work.. http://www.sciplus.com/p/BINO-SCOPE-HEAD_23709
Its a great start though
Re-design1 year ago
Just thinking about this gives me vertigo. If you don't get the views in perfect alignment (columinated?) you will probably get a headache, motion sickness etc. very quickly. I'm sensitive to that so I can't use cheap binoculars or play some 3d video games or I regret it very quickly.

So, if I were doing this, I'd try something using a good set of binoculars and fashion something like the stereo microscope.
Here's an easier version:
http://www.funsci.com/fun3_en/uster3/uster3.htm

Check out their home page . Lot's of links to stereo microscope / optics info.
Morgantao1 year ago
I don't think there's an easy solution...
Even if you can find a light splitter, prisms and lenses that will do the job, you will end up with less than half the brightness in each eye.
You can install a cheap camera to the eyepiece and have it feed to two small screens, and build yourself a kind of an Oculus Rift, but that will probably be more expensive than buying a surplus stereoscopic NVG.