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DNA Plasmids for use in transformation of plant cells?

Recently, I found a kit to transform E. coli with GFP (green fluorescent protein) plasmids, causing the bacteria to fluoresce under UV light. I later found a kit for maintaining an African violet tissue culture, sparking the question if it would be possible to use the plasmids intended for use in E. coli in the African violet tissue, causing the violet tissue to fluoresce, which can then be transplanted to grow into a full glowing violet plant. Would the plasmids be usable in transforming the violet tissue, or would they be specialized to just the E. coli?

lemonie4 years ago
It can be done, but bacterial-cells are different to plant cells, so I wouldn't expect the e-coli kit to work.

L


http://www.unh.edu/inquiryjournal/06/commentary/kendrick.html
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15384490
ALogan97 (author)  lemonie4 years ago
C'est vrai... maybe obtain modifed Agrobacterium tumefaciens (bacteria that cause crown gall) that have the tumor-inducing gene extracted, then transform that with the GFP plasmid -- since it's a bacteria, it has a higher chance of working with a plasmid for use in bacteria -- and infect the violets with the modified Agrobacteria. Agrobacteria work by injecting their own DNA into plants (which, naturally, would insert a tumor-inducing pathogenic gene), but if the gene to be injected is replaced with the GFP gene, then it would inject the GFP plasmid into the plant instead of the tumorous gene. That should work, the only issue is getting the permit required for obtaining such a pathogenic bacteria.
bwrussell4 years ago
I'm assuming they are specialized for the E. coli. Biology isn't really a one-stop-shop sort of thing I don't think.
ALogan97 (author)  bwrussell4 years ago
C'est vrai... maybe obtain modifed Agrobacterium tumefaciens (bacteria that cause crown gall) that have the tumor-inducing gene extracted, then transform that with the GFP plasmid -- since it's a bacteria, it has a higher chance of working with a plasmid for use in bacteria -- and infect the violets with the modified Agrobacteria. Agrobacteria work by injecting their own DNA into plants (which, naturally, would insert a tumor-inducing pathogenic gene), but if the gene to be injected is replaced with the GFP gene, then it would inject the GFP plasmid into the plant instead of the tumorous gene. That should work, the only issue is getting the permit required for obtaining such a pathogenic bacteria.