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HOW DO YOU DRAW REAL PEOPLE,AND HOW DO YOU MAKE AN EYE LOOK REAL,OH AND WHAT OTHER MATERIALS DO YOUR NEED?

LIKE I WANT 2 KNOW MORE HOW TO DRAW REALISTIC PICTURES MORE CARTOON CHARACTERS AND MAKE REALSTIC EYS,SO CAN YOU  PLZZ HELP ME OUT CUZ I DRAW PPL LOVE MY DRAWINGS THEY TELL ME,IM HAPPY WHEN THEY SAY THEY LIKE IT AND WANT 2 BUY IT BUT I WANT 2 BE MAGINIFICENT,BETTER

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fishdirt5 years ago
Do what most professional photo realistic portrait illustrators and artist do...copy.

Yep, secrets out of the bag. Most of the realistic paintings and drawings you see are done by people who can't freehand. So here's what they do in various ways:

Use a projector. Find a picture and project the image onto paper and trace all parts and even shadow lines (this makes it easier to color later).

Light box. Simply put the drawing surface over a photo and trace.

Grid method. Harder but still simple. Draw a grid over the drawing surface and put a grid over the photo.

trace transfer. Get transfer paper, trace a picture onto it. Turn it over on blank paper and rub the back. Lift off and the image is now on your drawing paper.

With practice anyone can do this. Personally I think it's better to be more creative and draw things in your own way while making them dynamic and solid looking.

Swampy5917 years ago
I personally like the exercise of drawing a picture while it's upside down, so as not to fall into the trap of drawing what you think it should look like...
lemonie7 years ago
Your keyboard seems to be broken, they're not expensive to replace.
See here for some drawing instruction:
drawing/

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The most common trap people fall into when trying to capture realism is to draw (paint, sculpt, &c) as they think the object should look, rather than drawing it exactly as you see it.

To put it another way, imagine you're an alien visiting Earth from another planet.  Obviously, you have the technology to clone a human if you want, but you want to draw one instead just for the challenge.  You've never seen a human being before, and your race of superior beings look nothing like them at all - you have scaly blue skin, four arms, and seventeen eyes.

Now, having never seen a human being before, you have no preconceived notions as to what one might look like - and when you finally see one, they're grotesque by your standards.  They're so hideous, in fact, that the only way you can get keep your five stomachs settled is to remember what your art teacher told you.

A drawing is nothing more than light and shadows.  You define the light by making shadows.

With this in mind, you focus on a tiny section of shadow.  You lightly make the shape of it with your pencil, then you check that zone to see if you have the shape just right - correct if necessary.  Then, start to shade it by matching the tones.  Lighter pressure to show more light, harder pressure for a deeper shadow.  Check the shapes of each shade, and adjust them as necessary.

Also, don't think of drawing lines unless the real object possesses a solid line (you'll find soon enough that nothing really does).  Outlines become cartoonish, because they do not really depict the light and shadow that is staring you in the face.  If you must separate two equally shaded areas (like white on white), make certain that one area is just perceptibly darker than the other.

I also advise to start with that blob up top that appears to be a face.  Nail the face, and the rest will follow.

As for proportions, I've found that they are merely a guide - a good guide, but not hard and fast rules.  People are built all kinds of ways, and depending on the positioning and angle you view them, they can appear really disproportionate.  Instead, using this "alien blob method", make sure the scale of the subject matches what you've drawn.  The reason you see people sticking their pencils at arm's length is because they're using their pencil to measure (and it will roughly fall in the same place at arm's length, making the measurements fairly predictable and precise).  Find key points in the subject, and measure their shape and scale to what you have drawn.

Just don't get hung up on whether it looks like an eye, or a mouth, or whatever.  Instead, ask yourself if the shape and shades you've drawn match those of the subject.  It will only look finished when it's finished, but when it's finished you'll find this method produces immediate realism (and better results, of course, come with practice).
jtobako7 years ago
DETAILS COUNT, SUCH AS USING FULL WORDS AND FINDING THE CAPS LOCK KEY...

Proportions are everything.

Learn shading.

Look at what you want to draw like and look at how it was done.

Lots of tutorials on the web, just takes a quick search...
orksecurity7 years ago
Hit the library for a copy of "Drawing On The Right Side Of The Brain." The theory is dubious, but the exercises are wonderful.
Re-design7 years ago
Why don't you post some examples so we can see where you are and what you are lacking?

For the most part what most people are lacking is just real practice under the tutilage of some knowing person who can guide their hand toward the true path of artistic freedom.