HOW TO PAD/CUSHION/BUFFETT TURNTABLES FROM SKIPPING DUE TO FOOT-TRAFFIC?

 I HAVE A BASIC, BELT-DRIVEN, PIONEER TURNTABLE. THE TURNTABLE IS USED FOR REGULAR PLAYBACK, NOT FOR TURNTABLISM. THE TABLE CURRENTLY SITS ON A SMALL, FLAT, LEVEL, WOODEN TABLE (APPROX. 18 INCHES HIGH.) THE TURNTABLE HAS FOUR PLASTIC FEET ATTACHED WITH SMALL SCREWS. THE CARTRIDGE HEAD RIDES WELL, WITHOUT SWAY, AND WITHOUT RIDING TOO HEAVILY ON ITS NEEDLE. HOWEVER, THE CARTRIDGE DOES TEND TO SKIP WHEN PEOPLE WALK THROUGH THE ROOM, WHICH HAS OLD WOODEN FLOORS THAT CARRY VIBRATIONS(ESPECIALLY FOOTSTEPS,) WELL. IS THERE A SIMPLE SOLUTION e.g., rubber mats, padding, etc., or a more involved solution,e.g., floating platforms, spring cushioned platforms, suspension systems?
* I prefer not to add weight to the cartridge head balance e.g., turning balance weights forward on arm, adding pennies to cartridge head. etc.
thanks, and sorry about previous caps. in text.

CrLz8 years ago
I had a turntable with a deck floating on springs.  Seemed to do a nice job avoiding your problem.

BTW- I'd also consider the table and floor situation.  Old wooden floors can vibrate, particularly between floor joists.  You table could be just in a spot that really jumps up and down.  Heavy wool rug under the table would help.

If the table is very light, it can also act a bit like a 18" tuning fork.  Try to damp down any sort of this activity. Heavily weight the table right under your turntable, or place a heavy dampener under the turntable.
Go to a fabric store and purchase a piece of high-density foam at least 1" in thickness.  Using a serrated knife, cut it to the length and width of the turntable.  It's green and ugly, I know, but it will do a fantastic job of absorbing shock.  I wouldn't paint it as the solvents in paint may eat the foam.

Otherwise, Burf is right.  Make sure the turntable is level in all directions, replace the stylus if necessary (this will prevent wear on the record and eliminate distortion as well), and check for proper settings on the anti-skate wheel if it has one.

I would also see if the cartridge is original.  If it's been replaced, the new one might be too light (which is the reason for the anti-skate adjustment).  If your turntable doesn't have this adjustment (as most lower-end turntables do not), then the manufacturer balanced the tone arm by design for the original cart, and therefore you may be out of luck.
Burf8 years ago
You can cut an old (or new) mousepad into 4 pieces and place them under the turntable legs to isolate it from vibrations.
Also check for the following:
A worn or dirty phonograph needle can cause skipping
If it has an anti-skate adjustment, make sure it is set properly
Make sure the tonearm set to the proper stylus pressure
Check the cartridge angle.

Check your owners manual for the specs for these adjustments