HOW TO REMOVE FROM SOLID OAK?


I HAVE A N EARLY 1900s  ANTIQUE OAK 3 DOOR  ICE BOX.
MY FATHER STAINED IT WITH LINSEED OIL SOME WHERE IN THE EARLY 80s.
IT LOOKS A BIT DARK AND DINGEY.
I WANT TO REMOVE THE EXISTING FINISH AND BRIGHTEN IT UP.
WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO REMOVE LINSEED OIL?

Vyger6 years ago
In addition to what ORK said there are also chemicals that can lighten wood, and in particular Oak. Even some bleaches are used. But its something that you want to be very careful about, the normal advise is to try it on a place thats not visible first (like the bottom) and see how it works. There is a lot of information around about refinishing. Just Google it and do a bunch of research.
orksecurity6 years ago
Linseed oil soaks into the wood. If you really want to remove it all, you're going to have to go after it with sanders and scrapers. If you just want to remove the top layers -- which may be enough to improve its appearance -- you could try scrubbing it down with a solvent (paint thinner or acetone, perhaps).

Websearch "remove linseed oil" for more information.

HOWEVER: General advice is never to tamper with the finish on an antique if you can avoid doing so. The patina of accumulated age and wear is part of the history of the object, and removing it may significantly reduce the object's value as an antique. If you care about that, I'd suggest asking someone who knows more about antiques whether there's a more appropriate way to handle it. (Perhaps simply going after it with an oil soap would be more appropriate. Perhaps not. That's beyond my limited knowledge.)