Help, how do I wire this speaker together?

Hi, I'm doing an A Level project at College, and I'm making an MP3/iPod speaker system. I'm using a 3.5mm headphone jack to connect my iPod to my speaker.
I followed these instructions to wire my headphone jack to my speaker, and it worked!:
https://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-wire-a-headphone-jack-to-a-speaker/

However, I want it to be a little louder, and it mentioned using an amplifier between the speaker and the headphone wire. Also I want to use a 9v battery to power my speaker, instead of using my iPod battery.
I'm new to electronics.

I've got a 6 ohm, 6-10watt speaker.
I searched for a cheap amplifier at Maplins, and I've found a 1watt ampilifer kit, would that be ok, would it be enough to boost the volume a little? The reason why I have to buy a cheap one is because I need to stay on a low budget (specification related).
So how would I wire/connect the headphone jack, the amplifier, the 9v battery connector and the speaker into one circuit?

This is the 1watt amplifier I have found:
http://www.maplin.co.uk/Module.aspx?ModuleNo=220054

Thanks for reading, and I hope you'll be able to help me :)
-Mason

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Re-design6 years ago
1 watt will indeed give you much more volume.

There is one issue.  That amp is a mono amp and your ipod is stereo.  If you want stereo then you'll need either a stereo amp or two of these amps.  You can get a cheap stereo amp if you can find an old set of amped computer speakers.

That amp is also a kit.  It's a very easy kit to assemble but if you've never done any electronics before it might take some learning first.

The connection is easy.  The output from the ipod goes to the input of the amp.  The output of the amp goes to the speaker.  The speaker will sound MUCH better if it's in a proper speaker box.

Don't be too sure about getting a cheap stereo amp from an old set of amped computer speakers - the last set I took apart turned out to be mono pretending to be stereo.

L
Mason12310 (author)  Re-design6 years ago
Thanks for letting me know about the issue. Otherwise I wouldn't been lost.

I just took apart my old computer speakers and found a stereo amplifier.
The amplifier has got a power button, a volume control, a 3.5mm socket, an LED light.
The wires coming from the amplifier are an AC adaptor socket (where the AC adaptor connects to power the speakers), wires which connect to two speakers, and a 3.5mm jack.

So what I'm thinking is just use these speakers instead (of course I'm going to make my own speaker cabinet/box, I just want the actual circuit to make my speaker work). However, I want it to be battery powered. So how am I going to do that? Can I just cut the AC adaptor socket which is connected to the amp (leaving some wire left) and connect the 9v battery connector to those wires?
What voltage is the AC adapter? And it is ac or dc output?
That cylinder battery like thing is probably a capacitor and the 16V is it's rating not the voltage of the amp.
Mason12310 (author)  Re-design6 years ago
The AC adaptor output is 9V 200mA.
So I guess adding the 9v battery is ok then?
As long as the adapter says DC. You have to connect the battery in the right orientation.
Mason12310 (author)  Re-design6 years ago
The AC adaptor says AC, not DC.
You mean as long as the 9V battery connector says DC?
Mason12310 (author)  Re-design6 years ago
Oh, and the little cylinder battery-like things sticking out from the amplifier says 16v. Would the 9v battery still be able to power them?
Mason12310 (author)  Re-design6 years ago
Sorry about that spelling mistake, I meant "Otherwise I would be lost"
frollard6 years ago
http://www.dealextreme.com/products.dx/category.410~search.amplifier

Simple in>out with pot or incremental volume controls, stereo, several watts, for around 10 dollars shipped. Pipe dream!

They just started carrying these, in chip form and evaluation board form.
oop, looks like these don't offer variable gain without some tinkering, I was thinking of another chip, will post if i remember it -- either way this is a pretty hot deal.
Which A level ? Physics ? Electronics ? WoodWork ?
Mason12310 (author)  steveastrouk6 years ago
Design Technology (Resistant Materials)