loading

Hi to all, new here but I thought Id ask if this would work? I have a dead AC unit that I want to turn into a heater?

If I take the outside cooling coil fron the AC,. bring it inside and rapp it around the top of my fireplace/ wood stove . replace the freeon with glycol or anti-frezze. Would I not be able to take the exccess heat from the wood stove and move it to the $$$forced air electric furnace  for distobution trough the house?
What do you guys think?
Will this work?
What did I miss?
Regards Neil

sort by: active | newest | oldest
framistan7 years ago
There are several problems with your scheme to use the airconditioner condenser unit for that purpose : 

     1.  Antifreeze can only withstand somewhat LOW heat temperatures.  The heat from a woodfire is much higher than antifreeze can withstand. 

    2.  Water turns to STEAM at about 212 degrees,, which would pressurize the pipes and possibly burst them.

    3.  STEAM can be deadly... be carefull.  We are not talking about the steam you can SEE that comes off a coffeepot or tea-kettle.  That steam is only 212 degrees...  REAL steam can be MUCH HOTTER (many hundreds of degrees).  and it is invisible and if you breath it,... it can kill you by damaging your lungs.  Be very carefull if you build such a system.

   I dont want to COMPLETELY destroy your idea though.  Because the basic idea is possible, I believe i have seen the idea at MOTHER EARTH NEWS magazine.  So don't give up.... just do some more researching the idea at other websites like fieldlines.com or motherearthnews.  You are not the first person to try to build something like this.  I am sure you can find your answer by researching on one of those 2 sites.  good luck!
bnmiller (author)  framistan7 years ago
Thank you Feildlines lead me to www.hilkiol.com
Thanks again for your help.
Neil
grundisimo7 years ago
Won't work. DEAD means cannot be used again.
Not terribly practical. You're going to really struggle to get good thermal contact to transfer enough heat to be worthwhile.

THE method needs the coil INSIDE the fire.

Steve
or above it, as long as it doesn't negatively impinge on the air flow.

I also think it's a bit safer with fireplace heat-exchangers to use air transfer, rather than liquid filled, but that's just my opinion...I'm sure someone else will agree with using a more complex arrangement.
Sandisk1duo7 years ago
the pump won't be able to handle the stress, it was designed to pressurize gas, and not pump a liquid.