How Do I Change AC hertz?

So the one local power company has a complete monopoly on my city. I was thinking that this summer, I would produce my own power, and possibly give some away free to my neighbors. I am thinking that I will use solar steam generators to make steam that will power an array of Tesla turbines like those of mrfixits to generate electricity. The only problem is that the steam will likely push the turbines far above the 60 hz we use in the US. Is there any way to reduce the frequency without slowing down the turbines? Also, why does AC need a hot and a neutral wire to function? Isn't the whole point of AC that you don't have to send electricity all the way to the customer and then bring it all the way back? And are there any good i'bles on winding generators, magnets, etc.? Thanks!

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NachoMahma8 years ago
> reduce the frequency without slowing down the turbines? . You will need to be able to closely regulate your turbines at a constant speed and use generators designed to operate at that speed. . Or use a DC generator and an inverter. . > why does AC need a hot and a neutral wire to function? . The best short answer I can give you is: That's just the way it works. You have to have a complete circuit for electricity to flow. . It involves the movement of electrons and the exchange of electrical charges. You need to learn the basics. . > Isn't the whole point of AC that you don't have to send electricity all the way to the customer and then bring it all the way back? . Nope. It's more efficient to distribute AC than DC. . . Judging by your questions, you have a LOT of studying to do before you attempt this project. . . If you are going to be distributing electricity to your neighbors, I hope you have good liability insurance.
al_taka8 years ago
That sure is a mouthful of questions and your biting off a lot more then you can chew at this point. Start with the basics and go through electric and electronic theory and work your way up. Its quite an enjoyable journey. I haven't dabbled in steam power or Tesla turbines. -If your frequency is too fast or non stable you'll need to convert it to DC and then use a inverter which regulates the Volts, Current and Frequency. -AC in home wiring could run on two black wires but there's a little thing called safety. Back in old DC days thats the way it ran. The power coming into our homes comes in on 3 conductors, 2 black wires and the ground/neutral lead. Voltage between the black wires is 220vac. Either black wire to neutral is 110 vac. If a short happens anywhere in the home circuit it will blow the circuit breaker which connects to one or both of the black conductors. - About electrons not needing to go back to the source on every half cycle, I seen that on tv once and disagreed with it. Homes and business get power from the secondary side of power transformers, its a closed loop. Every time power is stepped down it enters a closed loop for electrons. We are coupled magnetically to the input of the transformer. The electrons themselves never jump to the primary side but do travel in the loop many times because they travel 1550 miles in a 1/120 of a sec -I have never tried winding motors or transformers, looks like a pain. Sorry, for the long answer Enjoy your studies..
lemonie8 years ago
Again with the Tesla turbines...
If you think your turbines will run too fast under load, add a gearbox.
AC doesn't need the hot and neutral, it is a convention to distribute it in this way.

L
> AC doesn't need the hot and neutral, it is a convention to distribute it in this way. . What other method is there? You have to have a complete circuit.
Three phase distribution circuits don't have a neutral. The sum of the phases is zero (or very close to it, in the real world.)
. Not entirely true (or false). See Wye Systems
I'm referring to the convention of labeling the wires as such, though I guess it wasn't that sharp in the explanation. L
. Ah.