How can i be notified when my washing machine has turned off?

I have a washer which does NOT make an audible noise when it's finished it's cycle.

I would love to figure out a way to be notified when the machine has turned off.

The machine has lights which are on during the different cycles, and then turn off when the cycle(s) are complete. I would imagine this could be a way of triggering perhaps and audible queue.

I wouldnt really know how to go about getting started with this though or if this is the right approach.

This would be a link to what my washer looks like.
http://images01.olx.com/ui/4/50/11/1267472745_77434911_2-GE-Electric-Washer-and-Dryer-for-sale-EXCELLENT-condition-Baytown.jpg

i would love any assistance for those who may have an idea on how to get started or what sensor(s) i may want/need.
Thanks in advance.
-
 James

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iceng6 years ago
Well, buy one of those remote two part Door-Bells then
buy a $9 AC current sensor from Phenx at

http://phenixcontrols.com/?path=Home/Products/Sensor/Current&ga=1&gclid=CN-g9p-5n6gCFQImbAod3GgzHw

The way this works, the sensor closes the 2 left contacts of the relay whenever that Quiet washer of yours sucks serious current. There are circuit components to ignore those moments when when the washer only draws thinking current between cycles.
When your washer is finished after a bit of no motor current RC time it will turn on the NFet, activating the transmitter which dings or buzzes the remote hanging around your neck, because your only shirt pocket was dirty laundry.

Make sure the NFet is wired as shown. The other way (D-B and S+A) won't hurt anything and won't work.

A
washer001.jpg
Vyger6 years ago
Get a simple kitchen timer and set it for however long the average time of the cycle is. Its the cheapest and easiest thing to do.
caarntedd Vyger6 years ago
+1. Our machine broke, and had an audible alarm. We were given another machine for free which is silent. A $3 kitchen timer works a treat (we also use it for the dryer). Plus you can keep it nearby, or even in your pocket if your working around the house or yard. Best answer.

The problem for most newer washers is that the cycle time changes based on how well the clothes dry in the spin cycle, and how much, what type of soap is used. So thin T-Shirts may take less time than denim jeans. As far as the dryer goes the concept is similar, I dry my clothes on automatic, so it shuts off when it reaches a specified dryness level, which may take longer for that load of denim jeans.

iceng6 years ago
My answer is the easiest to build.
Add a simple self contained isolated safe current relay.
The easy to use remote doorbell.
And some glue logic. To guarantee it to ding you when done
I think I may make a ding bat ible out of this.
There is no microprocessor needed and no need to modify any part of the quiet washer.

All in all a awasum solution for a reasonable price.

A.
lemonie6 years ago

Is your machine random & unpredictable, do you never really know how long it takes?
I know when it's done after the final spin (which does make an audible-noise).

L
darlok21 (author)  lemonie6 years ago
well, i'm sure there are definitive times, but we do use different cycles for different washes.

it's half for the usefulness and half for the fun in DYI project.

Right, I'll guess it's in a garage / basement somewhere out of sight?
It will have a solenoid door-lock, you could tap into that as a final-finish switching event.
Your communication channel might work with one of those baby-snooping devices that run through the mains.
Do either of those sound promising?

L
aelias366 years ago
You can make something similar to this:
http://www.quinndunki.com/blondihacks/BlondiHacks/Index/Pages/Dish-o-Tron_6000.html