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How can i keep my MOT from drawing to many amps and why dose it heat up so much when I draw arcs?

I just made a 3 phase MOT power supply and it's fun to play with (while being safe) but every time I use both phases it trips the breaker after only 2 arcs, sometimes it trips just from plugin it in, I am using a PFC cap on the mains side as well as a long extension cord, I have one of the transformers ballasted, and one of them has 3 MOC's in series on its output, the breaker can handle one of them just fine...for a little while. Is there any thing else I can do besides buying a bigger breaker switch? I'd say mine is 20A but i dont know for sure. 

Every time I draw arcs from my MOT it heats up really fast really hot, I am using the same setup as above , the only thing I can think of is to submerge it in oil but I dont want to do that because I'll want to make changes to it. What makes it different from a welding transformer in that they are made to draw arcs from but when you draw an arc from a MOT its a direct short and will eventually destroy the transformer?

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JohnW321 year ago

You need something to limit your current. A resistor of sorts. I use a heating element for a $10 water heater from home depot (13A/1650 watts). Also, it sounds like your MOT *might* be to small. If the center is too small for your amps it will heat up like an induction heater.

A circuit diagram would be helpful. Just from the text of your question I am having trouble following what you are doing. The excessive heat and breakers tripping indicate that you are drawing too much current from your mains supply, but you probably already guessed that. The breakers are there to prevent you from melting the wiring of your house or commercial building.

BTW, which is it? I am guessing this is your house, a US type residential power connection,  two "hot" lines, both 120 Vrms, and 180deg out of phase with each other.  Three phase power, as found in a factory/laundromat/supermarket/etc,  has three "hot" lines, at 0, 120deg, and 240deg, phase difference from each other.
Jimmy Proton (author)  Jack A Lopez6 years ago
I'm doing this at my house, its converting 2 phase into 3 phase.
3 phase power.jpg
Two phase? Most houses don't have two phase. Only single phase.
Jimmy Proton (author)  dog digger6 years ago
I made a mistake, the entire setup is 1 phase.