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How do I dismantle a refrigerator???

I want to dismantle an old 'Slush Puppy' machine and remove the refrigerator, leaving only the mixing tank, motor and frame. Bearing in mind refrigerant is R404A, and I will need to cut the refrigerant lines to do it, is it a job I can/should undertake myself? If it is, what is the best way of going about it, and if not, who should I contact to do it for me??

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GDePuy5 years ago
("I want to dismantle an old 'Slush Puppy' machine and remove the refrigerator leaving only the mixing tank, motor and frame") You Can remove the components making up the cooling system. Compressor, both T.X.V's, both solenoids, condenser and fan. The evaporator you will not be able to remove since it is needed for the auger assembly. ("Bearing in mind refrigerant is R404A, and I will need to cut the refrigerant lines to do it, is it a job I can/should undertake myself? If it is, what is the best way of going about it, and if not, who should I contact to do it for me??") I believe its required by federal law that all refrigerants are to be recovered for reuse in the same machine or proper disposal through local suppliers. The machine should also be tagged (EPA sticker) documenting that the refrigerant has been recovered by a certified tech including the techs epa number. Some scrap handlers will not accept items not having this. I believe that nobody really knows for SURE what the environmental and people related hazards are for all these new flavors of refrigerants manufactured these days. Knowing this and you making the decision not following federal law just make sure you don't cut the lines with a tube cutter or you will get a surprise. I bet the machine don't take more then 4 or 5 lbs (64 to 80oz). Maybe even much less. Using a pair of lineman pliers pinch cut a small line and allow it to bleed off for a few hours or overnight. make sure you prepare for liquid refrigerant and oil coming out so get some rags handy. Just a thought! These things are notorious for leaking out the rear ceramic seals. I am not sure what fluid you are trying to mix up but maybe you should look around for something that mixes by use of magnets. I believe this technique is used all the time with small laboratory beakers. You might be able to come up with a nice project increasing the size for your purpose. Good Luck
fwjs285 years ago
dude! we have those at our school....cherrry is best :P
lemonie5 years ago
Apparently R404 A is an alternative to CFC-502, which is a widely accepted HFC refrigerant alternative to CFC-502. It does not deplete the ozone layer and isn't subject to any phase-out regulations.

MSDS

It doesn't seem to need specialist handling

L