loading

How to fix Windows 7 laptop after downgrading from Windows 10?

I recently upgraded  to windows 10 to try out the new OS. However I found that I preferred my old windows 7 OS better. Thus, I decided to revert back to my old operation system.

I went into settings and under recovery found where it said "Go back to Windows 7" and clicked on it. I let it go about its business and when I come back, my computer no longer starts up. It repeatedly gives me an error along the lines of "The computer encountered an unexpected error. Windows installation cannot proceed. To install Windows, click 'OK' to restart the computer , and then restart the installation." But when I click okay, the computer simply restarts and I get the same message again. 

The problem is that I do not have an external backup of all of my files because I did not expect anything like this to happen. If there is any way I can solve this problem without losing the files that I have I am all ears. Please provide any help or suggestions you can as I need to get my laptop up and running again.

The laptop is an Acer Aspire 7750G-9807 running Windows 7 Home Premium. Please help, anything in greatly appreciated!

geeknoob2 days ago

I would suggest the same. If you are not confident about this, have some pro do it for you depending upon how important the data on the laptop is. I have been in this awkward situation many times but I do a bootable USB with a windows 7 image on it, format the computer and boom, back in business. Here is how you can format hard drive from a bootable USB/PD/thumb drive : http://www.geeknoob.com/format-hard-drive-usb-drive.html

Before you do anything:
Get an external hard drive that is big enough to take a full copy of your internal hard drive.
E.G.: If you have a 200gb one installed get a 250 or 500gb external drive.
But if in doubt just get the same size as usually your original drive won't be full to the max.
Next is find a nice friend or simple different (working) computer to install a free hdd cloning software that allows for the creation of a bootable media - that bit is important.
There are also several Linux "Rescue CD's" available that offer cloning programs but again you will need a working computer to make any use of it in terms of downloading and burning ir onto a disk/USB stick.
Assuming your laptop is modern enough to give access at a bios level to use the external drive with the bootable clone software you can simple run it and literally copy your drive.
If your laptop does not allow for this the next best option would be to take your drive out and to place it into a PC with the corresponding SATA/USB adapter (check Ebay).
From there same story but you can use any windows based cloning software to clone your drive to an external one.

Now you can make a clean install of Windows 7 on your laptop and original drive, with a format first.
Once Windows is set up and running connect the external drive and copy your date back to where it should be.
Works with program data too but I highly recommend to install the software first instead of copying it from the backup windows folder.
Reason is simple: you won't have the required registry entries and additional files.

If you get hold of the Windows 7 media (either DVD or by creating a USB boot drive), boot from the Win 7 media and attempt to run the automated repair, if you're lucky it will repair the problem everything will be fine again. More likely you'll need to re-install Windows, so the question is how to back-up your files.

Presumably the inteegrity of the data on the drive is intact, so I'd be surprised if it's not accessible. If you know how to take the computer apart and remove the hard drive, you can attach it to another computer (either by installing it internally or via a SATA to USB HDD adapter). Another option is to boot from the Windows 7 media and use the command prompt to copy your user folder to an external USB drive.

If you can't get hold of Windows media you can download it using this free tool. It's a run-on-demand utility so there's no crapware or junk bundled with it. You can then use the ISO you download to burn a DVD or create USB boot media using the Microsoft USB Download Tool, which again is free.

Vyger10 days ago

I always expect things like this to happen. In fact I am usually surprised when things actually work.

You need to get a copy of Win 7 on a disk (the correct version) and use that to reinstall. You can borrow one from somebody or download the correct one from Microsoft. But be aware its a big download. And after the install it will need to do something like 1.3 gig of updates. Microsoft refuses to release a service pack for 7 so its an all day thing to update it after its installed.

Be aware that Microsoft is planning on dropping Win 7 in the next 1 1/2 years. They are making money on the data they collect and sell on people who use Win 10 so they want everybody locked into it. Its a big money maker for them. Unless you force it to turn off all the spyong stuff.