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How to power a microwave turntable motor outside of the microwave?

I am taking apart an old microwave and trying to use the turntable motor inside of it for another project, but I dont really know even how to power the thing once I get it out of the microwave. Does anyone have any ideas as to how I would do this. Also, I have a limited budget/limited knowledge of this type of stuff. I just need a motor that has decent torque and low rpms so I think this motor should work well.

tstovall4 years ago
This might be of use to future instructable users..

https://www.google.com/search?um=1&hl=en&q=12v%20power%20supply%20adapter&revid=108397119&biw=1600&bih=730&bav=on.2,or.r_cp.r_qf.&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=iw&ei=J9OLUeiiHNSw0QHizoCIAw#q=12v+power+supply+adapter&sa=N&hl=en&source=univ&tbm=shop&tbo=u&ei=K9OLUZzlOcHc0QG93YH4AQ&ved=0CDIQsxg&bav=on.2,or.r_cp.r_qf.&bvm=bv.46340616,d.dmQ&fp=51b553d9eae7f17a&biw=1600&bih=730
frollard6 years ago
Look at the incoming power circuit for the microwave, if the motor directly interfaces with that without any transformers in between, then its line voltage (likely).

If the motor connects (ignoring any relays) through a transformer then its probably DC or lesser voltage.

Do as others suggest and look on the motor itself, probably has markings.
Burf6 years ago
I have one that I removed from an old microwave oven and it is a straight 120v AC motor. I just connected an ordinary electrical cord to it and plugged it into a wall outlet. It turns at a whopping 5 (five) RPMs. I still haven't figured out a use for it.
Mine was clearly labeled 120v AC, you want to make sure of the voltage requirement before connecting it to household current.
orksecurity6 years ago
A quick websearch indicates that some of them are simple 110VAC clock motors, and some run on lower voltages. If you're lucky the motor may not be labelled; if not, look up replacement parts for that model of microwave and you'll probably find the answer there.

I suspect the turntable motor doesn't actually have that much torque. Remember, it's normally operating against almost no resistance, and a motor which is just barely good enough is generally cheaper than one which is more powerful than necessary.