How to remove the metal in a CD or a DVD in a simple and ecofriendly way? I want to use the clear plastic.

I would like to upcycle the clear plastic  (polycarbonate) in CDs and DVDs to Make all sort of things like smartphone supports, boxes, structres, and so on. I have already bent, cut, polish the plastic by I haven't found a satisfactory way to remove the metalic layer. Thaks to you all. 

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kfs164751 year ago

check out this video at 1:32 and you will see him remove cd metal foil. He is using a CCFL power supply and Cockroft-Walton multiplier.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v_K9bMGcaug

cd metal foil remover s.jpg

hey, had a similar situation with the CDs, i tried putting the CD in hot water, the film started to lift but not completely, im trying to boil, hopefully it will do the job without damaging the plastic, if that doesnt work i'll try the tape after the boiling. hope this helps

novelchip2 years ago

apply scotch tape to the label side of the CD. On most CD stripping the tape will remove also the metal, leaving the metal on the tape. Good luck

rickharris5 years ago
Scrape it off

Run through a microwave and then scrape

Soak in caustic soda - the film is Aluminium and is soluble in caustic soda
gserrano701 (author)  rickharris5 years ago
I tried microwave but it damages the plastic and I need it smooth and clear.
Could it be that I'm using the wrong settings?
No, all its doing is melting the aluminium into little pieces, not removing it.
But not exposed.....
Ah! rub over with fine wet and dry paper.
The metallic layer is usually sealed in by the plastic itself.

IF it were exposed, then a brief exposre to sodium hydroxide would shift it in seconds.
gserrano701 (author)  steveastrouk5 years ago
Thanks again. I had forgoten about the soap, you're right, besides, it'll make a wierd type of soap. I didn't know that the sodium peroxide neutralizes in contact with air, thanks for the info, as they say "you never go to bed without learning something new". I'll try the sodium peroxide and let you all know.
Don't forget to mark a best answer ! ;-)
gserrano701 (author)  steveastrouk5 years ago
I will vote, just want to try them and see which fits best my need. Thank for keeping in touch.
gserrano701 (author)  gserrano7015 years ago
Please where I wrote "peroxide" I meant "hidroxide", my mistake, lapsus finger.
gserrano701 (author)  steveastrouk5 years ago
Thanks for your interest. I once used chemical my son had used to etch a circuit board, it more or less worked but it's not ecofriendly, I'd like something that I can use and sort of neutralize and throw in the sink knowing that I'm not going to poison people, earth, rivers, animals. It doesn't matter if it takes time to remove the metal, the number one priority is it has to be ecofriendly.
Sodium hydroxide is fine then. The stuff is neutralised in the atmosphere in a few days. If it contacts greases it turns into soap.
That actually varies depending on when the disk was made and what kind of disk it is. Most often the metal layer is only being protected by the label on the top of the disk. This holds true for most music CDs and older DVDs. Any record able disk will have the tin layer protected by 2 layers of plastic. But like i said it can very. Most older disks only protected the tin layer with the label.
gserrano701 (author) 5 years ago
I appreciate your answers, will try the sand paper eventhough it'll mean polishing afterwards. I feel the caustic soda is good method but is not ecofriendly, dispossing of it will be quite complicated.
gserrano701 (author) 5 years ago
I appreciate your answers, will try the sand paper eventhough it'll mean polishing afterwards. I feel the caustic soda is good method but is not ecofriendly, dispossing of it will be quite complicated.
FoolishSage5 years ago
You can take the horribly impractical but extremely cool method used here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TlCCpCB-Gr4
gserrano701 (author)  FoolishSage5 years ago
This is one of the coolesr things I have seen. Shame it's way out of my league.