I have a Bunker Hill Security system and I need to boost the signal so I can get reception in another room in my house?


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thematthatter5 months ago

Pick a high gain antenna like a yagi-uda antenna and then point the antenna to the base station. It will have the same power output but instead of broadcasting in a circle it will broad cast in a straight line and increase the range.

+1

Here's a link to a Google(r) Shopping search for "2.4+GHz+directional+antenna"

https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&output=search&...

for anyone who wants to see little thumbnail pictures of what these things look like, plus approximate numbers for what they cost retail.

iceng5 months ago

Who is Bunker Hill ?

This is a good question.

To start with, Bunker Hill (r) is a brand name, not a person.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brand

Moreover it is a store brand,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Store_brand

one of a set of brand names, that seem to be owned by, and exclusively sold by Harbor Freight (r) Tools.

I mean, to see the pattern, all you have to do is browse through the Harbor Freight web site, or one of their paper print catalogs if you've got one handy.

Many, but not all, of the brand names sold by Harbor Freight have a name that includes the name of a well known Former American city.

Some examples:

Chicago Electric (r), is their brand for electric power tools.

Pittsburgh (r), is their brand for automotive tools and hand tools.

Portland (r), is their brand for outdoor power tools, like chainsaws.

Bunker Hill Security (r), is their brand for insecurity devices, like surveillance cameras.

I guess Bunker Hill is not really a city, but it is a name that sounds "American", since Bunker Hill was the site of some famous battle during the Former American Revolutionary War (1775),

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Bunker_Hil...

Anyway, the point of all this branding activity is to make brands that sound, or seem to be, American in character.

Of course the vast majority of these tools are manufactured in the People's Republic of China,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/China

and this fact is well known.

But when Harbor Freight sells these tools in America, aka the Former United States, they sell them under these American sounding brand names.

So basically there is this subtle, or not so subtle, psychological game being played with their brand names.

However this kind of mendacity is actually typical of the way things are done in the Branding/Advertising business. You know, advertisers deal in BS,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bullshit

and large amounts of it.

It's not like they're really fooling anybody. The reputation, good and bad, of Harbor Freight is pretty well established in my opinion. They sell mediocre-quality, Chinese made, tools at low prices, and this is what they're known for, and I don't think any amount of strategic branding is going to alter that reputation any time soon, or even a thousand years from now.

Jack A Lopez5 months ago

Could you do us a favor and add a link to your question, pointing to the product page for the thing you're asking about?

Or maybe I'll just try to guess which one it is... urhmmmmm... Is it this one?

http://www.harborfreight.com/4-channel-wireless-su...

Link to manual for the same:

http://manuals.harborfreight.com/manuals/62000-629...

Regarding the question of boosting the signal, you can probably get more power in your received signal by one or more of the existing antennas, with an antenna that is directional, i.e. an antenna with more gain in a particular direction.

Looking at the manual I linked to above, I noticed, on page 6, the receiver has an antenna connector, so to me that says it would be pretty easy to swap one antenna for another.

The frequency of the radio signal itself is 2.4 GHz, same band as WiFi (2.4 GHz is actually a band consisting of several channels, since there's lots of room there in the decimal points beyond the 4, e.g. 2.412GHz = 2412 MHz) and there are plenty of antenna designs out there, including WiFi antennas that will work with 2.4 GHz.

I remember, years ago, I actually built a pair of WiFi cantennas,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cantenna

for the purpose of sending WiFi signal between computers that were really far apart.

These days you can probably just buy a professionally made cantenna, that even comes with a connector that perfectly matches the shape of the connector on your receiver.

I'm not sure which one it is, possibly some flavor of SMA. That's a guess.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SMA_connector