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I have a Wireless Remote Controlled Headphone set without the REMOTE.How can use it?


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legionlabs7 years ago
You would need to crack them open and look up the datasheet for the wireless or infrared tranceiver module.

Example: http://www.semiconductorstore.com/pdf/newsite/nordic/nRF24Z1.pdf

Then you will need to design a unit capable of sending wireless signals that the chip can use, possibly by sourcing another unit of the tranceiver.

Then you will need to design a USB interface (I assume you are connecting this to a computer), and program a driver to use with your operating system of choice. It would be a nontrivial project.

It would be easier to buy a USB radio transmitter and integrate a small radio into the headphones, circumventing the original interface entirely.

What?
Vijapa (author)  DELETED_GuardianFox8 years ago
What? ......What is what
What exactly is the question. It makes very little sense the way it was asked. Why does your headphones set need a remote???
Vijapa (author)  DELETED_GuardianFox8 years ago
Sorry to phrase the question badly.....so here goes....this is a Cordless Stereo Headphone.All that I have this headset.Thers a power(on/off) switch and a volume control dial on the right side of the headset.How do I put it to work
So you don't have the transmitter??? The easiest project I can think of is to gut it and make a wired headset out of it. All you'd need is a bit of solder and the wires from another pair of headphones. Whether you make use of the volume dial or the switch is up to you and only slightly affects the difficulty of the project. If you can find out what frequency your headset operates on, and you have another device that can be tuned to the same frequency, you can use them together. My first thought is an old cordless phone or certain walkie-talkies. It's also likely that your headset is tunable, at least to some degree. For that you search the circuitboard for components which can be turned witha screwdriver... I forget what they're called, but they're square with a round centre that turns.
The only 'frequencies' that are normally used for headphones, in recent years, are either 900 Mhz or the newest and much better 2.4 Ghz . My spelling of those electronic names might be slightly wrong, but it's real close.  I base this info partly on the 3 years that I spent waiting for 2.4 Ghz headphones to be released, cause I hated the unreliable 900's and kept checking the usual places, asking at the stores etc...anyway, it's likely pretty common knowledge by now?
Potentiometers? Maybe.