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I need a circuit that can convert sine waves to square waves.

I need a circuit that can convert sine waves to square waves that works with a wide range of frequencies and doesn't change the frequency, for a project i am working on. I also need a circuit that can convert square waves to ramp waves that also works with a wide range of frequencies and doesn't change the frequency. Thank you in advance.

edidiong23 days ago

what makes an op amp convert a sine wave into a square wave?

edidiong23 days ago

what makes an op amp convert a sine wave into a square wave?

edidiong23 days ago

what makes an op amp convert a sine wave into a square wave?

To convert a sine wave to a square wave, use a comparator. During the positve portion of the cycle the output of the comparator will be high, and during the other half of the cycle the output will be low. The frequency will be unchanged. This circuit can be built from a single IC plus a few resistors.

To convert a square to a ramp, use a circuit called an integrator. This circuit is so named because the output is the integral of the input function. Remember from calculus that the integral of a constant function f(x)=K is a line g(x)=Kx +C.
This circuit is very similar to a low pass filter, and can be built from a single op amp plus a couple resistors and capacitors.

I haven't gone into tremendous detail about these two circuit here, but they are very common and well documented and should be just what you need.
Super_Nerd (author)  LargeMouthBass2 years ago
What would be a circuit that converts sine, square, OR ramp waves into a triangle wave.
Depends what you mean by "one" circuit.

Take a sine wave, square it by clipping, integrate it, its a ramp.
Take a square wave, square it by clipping, integrate it, its a ramp.
Take a ramp wave, square it by clippling, integrate it, its a triangle.

The problem is, done in analogue, keeping the integration time constant related to the period of the incoming waveform - that's VERY tricky, without a priori knowledge.
Toby Robb2 years ago
Nice answer above, using a comparator. All i could think of was a triac to detect the zero crossing point and trigger some logic, but i haven't used comparators nearly as much as i should. They seem quite useful.
rickharris2 years ago
It's called a clipper, at it's simplest it is 2 back to back diodes that cut off the top and bottom of the sine wave.

look up guitar fuzz circuits to see it in action.