Instructables

Is is acceptable to use instructions found on this site to create and sell things on Etsy?

I see lots of great ideas here.  Is it acceptable to use this as a resourse for adding items to my Etsy store? 

cairparavel2 years ago
To be honest with you I use Instructables as and advertising tool. I publish instructables on jewelry making and add a link to the item for sale. I hope it encourages them to purchase something from me but I also understand that in a way I am "giving away my secrets" of the trade.
As far as the legality of selling things found here on your Etsy site there are plenty of great answers above. But as far as general etiquette I say that by publishing an instructable you inherently give permission to recreate the item and do with it what you please. I would love for someone to see me on Instructables and purchase something from my store, but if instead they sell their version...well all I can say is that I am glad I could be of service, as that is the whole premise of the Instructables web site!

http://www.etsy.com/shop/CairParavelCreations
CameronSS3 years ago
The default Ibles license is CC BY-NC-SA.

Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike (by-nc-sa)
This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work non-commercially, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms. Others can download and redistribute your work just like the by-nc-nd license, but they can also translate, make remixes, and produce new stories based on your work. All new work based on yours will carry the same license, so any derivatives will also be non-commercial in nature.

If an Instructable is published under this license, you may not use it to make money, you must give them credit, and you whatever you do built upon their work must have the same license. You can determine the license type from the info box on the right sidebar.

That said, I suspect most Instructablobs don't consider which license they really want to apply to their work before  publishing, and a healthy portion don't even realize there's a choice. So, it's probably best to check, regardless of the license.

So which license should an Instructablob pick if they want their work to be free-use, non-patentable, but okay to make for sale? Such as an artist who sells their jewelry but generously posts how to make a certain type of earring or a 13-yr old who has a popsicle stand and shares his popsicle recipie?

I admit I was confused by the choices and so went with the default, but might find myself in that position in the future.
Then you just drop the NC (non-commercial) part of the license. The options are all Creative Commons licenses, so for a much more complete explanation of what they all mean, you can read about them on the Creative Commons site.
Thank you, I am sure I was not alone in my confusion.
Re-design3 years ago

Almost all of the things on here are not protected by any kind of copyright.

It's probably bad form to copy someone's instructable and manufacture it for sale.  But legally you are probably safe.

But all the ideas and the stuff you learn are your's to keep and use anyway you see fit for life.
(removed by author or community request)
-lots.

The majority of projects here are published "BY-NC-SA"

That is, you must give attribution for your source, you must not reproduce it for profit, and you must offer up any version you make on the same licence.

So, if you want to turn an Instructable into a commercial product, the license requires that you contact the author directly for permission to use their idea. If their idea is sourced from a similar BY-NC-SA project, they are not allowed to give such permission.

If the author gives permission, they are entirely within their rights to demand a share of any profits you make.
I stand corrected, I will delete my previous comment.
Kiteman3 years ago
Sorry, not acceptable, and I have seen ebay sellers get caught selling on instructables to which they had no rights.

The majority of projects here are published "BY-NC-SA"

That is, you must give attribution for your source, you must not reproduce it for profit, and you must offer up any version you make on the same licence.

So, if you want to turn an Instructable into a commercial product, the license requires that you contact the author directly for permission to use their idea. If their idea is sourced from a similar BY-NC-SA project, they are not allowed to give such permission.

If the author gives permission, they are entirely within their rights to demand a share of any profits you make.