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Is there a wwy for me to make goggles that will allow me to see laser beams?

I've made a laser grid, and I want to see the beans without using water mist. I'm using a standard laser pointer, the kind you get from the dollar store. Is there some way I can see them with goggles or mist?

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kelseymh7 years ago
No. Light of any kind (laser, flashlight, whatever) is only visible if it travels from a source into your eye. Most beams (like flashlights) spread out a lot, so even if it is not pointed directly at you, you'll still see some of the light from that spreading. Lasers are narrow (highly collimated) beams. Since they don't spread out (much), there's less opportunity for your to see the light unless it's pointed directly at you. What water mist, or talcum powder, or dust, does is to provide lots of "scattering centers." When light hits a bit of dust/water/etc., it will be reflected off in some random directions. Sometimes, that random direction will be towards your eye. If you put enough of those scattering centers into the air, then a bit of the light will be scattered in your direction all along the beam's path.
fwjs287 years ago
i can see the beans without any goggles....im afraid its your eyes....
i think he meant after digestion… eww
karnuvap7 years ago
Yup - its the laws of Physics I'm afraid. Light is only visible when seen direct or reflected off another surface into your eye Way to go! building the grid though.
XOIIO (author)  karnuvap7 years ago
Thanks, although it's not that hard. You just need a tripod, a nut that fits on it, a laser pointer, a switch and some cheap mirrors. Just cut open the laser pointer and replace the momentary switch with a toggle switch, glue the nut on it, screw it on to the tripod and bounce the beam off of the mirrors. Just putting this out there in case anyone wants to make a grid themselves.
Kiteman7 years ago
I'm afraid Hollywood has lied to you. If you're not using a mist or cloud or dust to make the beam visible, lasers will only show when they actually strike your eye.