Need Help With Wiring Up Two Limit Switches?

I have a closure system with deadbolts that works on a sliding assembly with a solenoid that turns 180-deg to close and the other 180-deg to open. It is accomplished with two limit switches (as shown in the picture attached). My question is I have a single control button. If I press it once -- I need it to trigger the power in conjunction with one of the limit switches (to stop the solenoid at the appropriate time) and then on the next press of the button, send power through the other limit switch so it cuts power at the appropriate time. Obviously if I wire everything at once you have one switch open when the other closes and vice versa so power continues.

My question is this. I believe I can use a 4017 chip to allow power to go to one and then the next with each press of the button. However it seems like overkill and I figure that there has to be a simple one-two power diverter switch of some kind that I can put between the button and the solenoid/limit switches so it cycles between the two. In other words. When power comes through it the first time, it routes it into limit switch #1, the next power cycle goes through to limit switch #2, and back and forth.

Is there something simple like that. If so please share. If not, can someone please tell me the best way to wire up a 4017 chip for this purpose.

As always, thanks in advance for any experience, advice and/or wisdom -- it is greatly appreciated.

Picture of Need Help With Wiring Up Two Limit Switches?
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Here's a circuit for a simple pulser for bi-directional motors. It needs two chips, a 4027 CMOS JK flipflop and a L293 half bridge driver.
Copy of Bistable motor pulser.png
Relays would be a possibilty. I can't really see using a penny-cost IC is "overkill", but a decade counter wouldn't be my preferred method - I'd use a couple of flip-flops. One press of the button sets on flip flop and turns the motor, until it hits the limit switch. That stops button presses reaching the first flip flop. Pressing again sets a second flip-flop and then turns the motor backwards, until it hits the first switch.
pletchman (author)  steveastrouk5 years ago
Hello Steve. I just asked Iceng a question on this and would like your opinion as well. He gave me a circuit that worked well but sometimes acting sporadically when using two solenoids.

I picked up a couple 2-wire door actuators which I found work better. They eliminate the limit switches. So if I went with two (2) wire actuators, how would I wired it up so that it alternative polarity with each step.

In other words, I press the button and it lets through +/- as expected. The next press of the same button sends through -/+. In this manner the actuators retract/extend accordingly.

Thanks for any input and guidance you may have.
pletchman (author)  steveastrouk5 years ago
Sounds like that may be the best method. I am a novice when it comes to circuitry. Can you tell me how I would set up a flip flop system for this application. Thanks again for the guidance. It is appreciated.
iceng5 years ago
Try this circuit...

A
DUAL-SENSOR555MOTOR.JPG
pletchman (author)  iceng5 years ago
That seemed to work well until I incorporated two separate solenoids. It was really difficult to get them to stay sync'd up. I picked up a couple 2-wire door actuators which I found work better. They eliminate the limit switches. So if I went with two (2) wire actuators, how would I wired it up so that it alternative polarity with each step.

In other words, I press the button and it lets through +/- as expected. The next press of the same button sends through -/+. In this manner the actuators retract/extend accordingly.

Thanks again for your wisdom and experience.
pletchman (author) 5 years ago
Still looking for assistance on this wiring question. I am okay with using a flip-flop or perhaps a flip-flop circuit using 555 timer and/or 4017 IC. Any input, guidance or wisdom is greatly appreciated.