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Please suggest me a charging circuit for 12V 7.2 Ah lead acid battery without application of transformer

                                     I am using 12V 7.2Ah Amaron Quanta lead acid battery for an Emergency Lamp. I am using the following charging circuit which is attached with this post. In this charging circuit, 230 ac voltage is given as input to the 16-0-16 transformer. The output of transformer is filtered through rectifier diodes and then given as input to the LM317 of charging circuit. As of now transformer is needed to step down the ac input voltage. I need a charging circuit without a transformer. So kindly suggest me a circuit which consists of input rectification without a transformer. Please suggest it with a moderate cost. And also I need one more clarification. I am using "Constant Voltage" - trickle charging method to charge the battery. I am using a load of 2 lamps of total 110 W lamps which stand for around 50 minutes of full charged battery. The lamps will cut-off at 9.5-9.8 V. Then it takes around 16 hours to make the battery full charge. Could you please confirm me if I can charge the battery soon (min 6 hours). Is so at what rate I should use the load. Please help me in this situation.

                                     I mention the website link which I am currently using for charger circuit.

                                    http://www.circuitstoday.com/lead-acid-battery-charger

In this circuit, I am using a 16-0-16 transformer to convert the line voltage of 230V ac and bridge rectifier diodes to convert it into dc. Please suggest me a circuit without the application of transformer to convert 230V ac to dc.


                                        My mail id is tvibakar@gmail.com.

Thanks,
Thomas.

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zaronas5 years ago
get some sollar cells just a few like some of those out of a solar powwerd calculator and wire it up you wont need anything else capt maybe a few capacitors to regulate the voltage
tvibakar (author)  zaronas5 years ago
Thank you very much for your reply zaronas. I will try it off.
No chance of that working. Don't bother.
why?
The energy output of the cells they use in calculators is miniscule. This battery needs 700-800mA to charge it, in 10 hours.
just get alot of them, but yah you are right i didnt think about that,
You can't. You have to use a transformer, or an existing 15V DC supply.
tvibakar (author)  steveastrouk5 years ago
Thanks for your reply steveastrouk.
Any circuit that doesn't use a transformer to convert the AC input to a lower DC voltage will probably be cost prohibitive to you. So you'll need to find a 15V DC source to charge your battery.
tvibakar (author)  mpilchfamily5 years ago
Thank you very much for your reply mpilchfamily . I ll find a 15V dc power supply soon.