Instructables

Scripting Vs Programming?

What is the difference between scripting and programming?

kchikkala2 years ago
Nice Article
http://www.ostesting.com/programming-language-vs-scripting-language/
Jayefuu3 years ago
One simple explanation is that with scripting the code is interpreted whereas with programming the code is compiled. Though for some languages it will depend on the users opinion of it. Perl and php are scripting languages; c, Delphi, Java are programming languages.
iceng Jayefuu3 years ago
In days long long ago Fortran was a compiler and Basic was a line by
line interpretive programming language.

In collage we had to punch out our fledgling programs on into a stack of
IBM cards to run by the 1620 computer operator who had no qualms
about terminating my run stack if he saw the beginning of a printer
graphing output.
So, we students, in the know, would carefully hold the output in an array and dump it as the last act in our code while distracting the operator with
a disturbance outside his cloistered computer area just to get three
graphed output wide fan fold pages :-þ

That was then, now Basic is also compiled :-)      A
Iceng: Do you really want to invoke the BYTE8406 rule ("all online discussions eventually degenerate into "I worked on an older machine than you did")?

If so, I refer you to Frank Hayes (former senior IT columnist for Computerworld Magazine, and filk (sic) song writer extraordinare) and his song "When I Was A Boy". There are a number of copies of it online, either performance videos (not by Frank, alas) or copies of the lyrics.

"When I was a boy, our Nintendo
Was carved from an old Apple tree
And we used garden hose to connect it
To our steam-powered color TV ...."

Go find the rest of it. It's worth the effort.
Up hill through a blizzard both ways !

I did uP before Grenoble had a network.

and still have my  CROMEMCO and some 8" Floppy Drives
seandogue iceng3 years ago
Get out. you don't really have a functioning Cromemco?

Back in college we found a large box of 8" disks being tossed into a university dumpster and built a "flicker" to launch them. The flew pretty well, although they tended to corkscrew.
iceng seandogue3 years ago
Can't really say it's running but it could be with those two 16K mem cards.

Those days, you didn't need a meg of ram to satisfy chairman Bill :-þ     A
photo5.JPG
What's the tune ? I found the words.
It's an original tune. You'll find at least one performance on YouTube:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p1fBd7UbQPA

Joe gives it a rather laid-back interpretation, to let the audience think about the lyrics. Frank does it more uptempo. And Joe leaves out some of the side comments, which I consider part of the fun of the song.

Perfectly reasonable; every performer makes a song their own.
Ork,
I've just had tears of laughter runnuing down my cheeks !

Thanks !

Steve
There have been many reply songs as well. One of my favorites, because it's entirely true but sounds just as absurd:

http://www.freemars.org/filk/wheniwas.html

(These are instances of filk songs. Filk, which is probably better described as a movement rather than as a genre since it spans so many different styles and topics, is the music of the SF and fantasy fandom community. Not all science/SF/fantasy music is filk -- it's a matter of both symbolism and intended audience. There's a log of good stuff out there if you go looking -- not all of it humorous, I should warn you.)
We are very fond of some filk songs in our household.
Fire in the Sky,
Banned from Arkam.
Somewhere inside this starship.
Dilithium Rhapsody..

Steve
Pah, you were lucky.

My dad remembers going with the physics class in his high school days (in the UK) to visit Manchester University's computer laboratory, where electronic music was heard by modulating the system clock - the more you flogged the CPU, the lower the note......

Steve
AM radio on the console, picking up the switching transients? Been there, done that...
So, why the new distinction between scripting and programming ? It seems very artificial, when "Java" is run on a "Just in time compiler", which to my way of thinking is a damned interpreter....
Actually, the JIT compiler really is a compiler, though a somewhat odd one; at least part of the program does wind up being compiled down to the machine-code level if it runs long enough. Don't ask about hotspot optimization; that's another complicated can of worms.

But, yes, the less-intensively-used parts of the Java program will probably stay in bytecode form, which is executed by an interpreter.

None of which has anything to do with scripting vs. programming. If your Java program is performing a sequence of programmed operations through the browser, it may be functioning as a browser script.. If it's running essentially stand-alone, then even if it was started as an applet it should be considered an independent program.

Scripting is a particular application of programming.
orksecurity3 years ago
In the original use of the word, a "script" is a program written to control another program or programs. The equivalent of .BAT files on Unix are called "shell scripts", because they define a sequence of programmed operations for the shell (the command-line interpreter) to perform. Browser scripts are programs which run inside the browser to manipulate its data and/or perform programmed browsing operations. And so on. It's about intent and application more than specific language, though some languages (I'll cite .BAT again) are too specialized or too inadequate to really use for much more than simple scripting.

Common usage has drifted a bit, but that's still how the pros and purists use the term.
.  +1. The line between program and script has become blurred of late, but I like what you just said. Even the compiled = programmed vs. interpreted = scripted gets fuzzy at times.
.  I like to think of the difference between scripting and programming as being similar to the difference between high-level and low-level programming. :)
yup, except that low level programming is was generally thought of as bit programming or machine coding (STA, PUSH, etc.) in most circles (in them olden days), even if machine code has fallen out of favor with the increases in speed and quasi universality of C-style programming wrappers.

(just being nit picky, although arguably, anything lower in the chain is low level when looked at from a higher level )

FTR, Not all that long ago,.C etc were considered to be HIGH-Level programming languages.
yup, except that low level programming is was generally thought of as bit programming or machine coding (STA, PUSH, etc.) in most circles (in them olden days), even if machine code has fallen out of favor with the increases in speed and quasi universality of C-style programming wrappers.

(just being nit picky, although arguably, anything lower in the chain is low level when looked at from a higher level )
I can sorta agree with that last point, if you think of the application(s) being scripted as an extremely-high-level subroutine library.

When talking about computer architectures, it's _all_ about nested levels of abstraction.
+1.

"The equivalent of .BAT files on Unix are called "shell scripts", because they define a sequence of programmed operations for the shell (the command-line interpreter) to perform."

It's how I would use the term.