Small Household Containers to hold gas?

I need a small container to hold extra gas for my dirt bike.

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AndyGadget4 years ago
 
I take it you're using the US meaning of 'gas' - Petroleum spirit.  We call that 'petrol' in the UK.

Forget household containers.  That stuff has a habit of leaking out of anywhere and all you need is a buildup of vapour and a spark . . . 

How about an aluminium camping fuel bottle - They're designed for keeping volatile liquids in.

(Gas/petrol, vapour and aluminium in a single answer.  Two nations divided by a common language #;¬)
iceng4 years ago
I presume this is to fill a couple of tires
What you want is a pony bottle it should serve your needs
31mV1tPraYL._SL500_SS100_.jpg31mV1tPraYL._SL500_SS100_.jpgponY.JPG
Tyres #;¬)
iceng iceng4 years ago
it would not let me delete the finger N2 wine cork remover gas cartridges.
This is a good question, and it seems like somebody, or multiple somebodies, must have by now found the courage to fill up an old container (soda bottle, milk carton, motor oil, antifreeze, etc) with gasoline, and then determine empirically if this is an adequate way to store gasoline, and also, most importantly, reported back these findings to an online forum somewhere.

So start here:
https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=gasoline+plastic+bottle

The first link, to that dirt bike forum, looks like it has some good chatter,
http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/717004-carrying-gas-in-plastic-soda-bottle/

Also,curiously, those search results include an occasion when someone asked the exact same question on this forum previously, um here:
https://www.instructables.com/answers/household-bottles-to-hold-gasoline/

BTW, among people who work with chemicals professionally, there is this notion of  "chemical comparability", or "chemical resistance", and this is bascially the story of what materials can be used to safely store, transport, manipulate, what chemicals.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compatibility_%28chemical%29
There exist tables with lists of materials, lists of chemicals, like this one:
http://www.coleparmer.com/Chemical-Resistance

and guides like that can be helpful for getting an overview of what might work, or not,  but you probably only have a limited number of cheap, available, containers  to choose from, and like I was saying at the beginning, it might be just as easy to do the testing yourself, or to rely on the anecdotes ( stories) of people on the forums who already have.
How small?

It's best if you buy approved containers.