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Without damaging the outer rectangle portion of 1/4" thick glass, how do I cut out a sink hole for a glass counter top?

Does anyone know how to cut out a circle, or other odd shaped hole, in a piece of thick glass where the goal is to not damage the outside rectangular portion of glass and the inside shape is the waste piece?  My wife wants a glass counter top on the bathroom vanity but I can't seem to cut out the hole for the sink without breaking the glass.  I have a few pieces of salvaged 1/4" thick glass but I am using them up very quickly trying to figure this out on my own!

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Circle cutting is tricky.

I make no guarantees of success, but the traditional method is as follows.

Buy a glass cutter and trammel arm - its like a pair of compasses with a suction cup at one end, placed at the centre of the future hole, and a good quality glass cutter,

Scribe, firmly AND ONE TIME ONLY the full circle.

Strike out, using a ruler through the waste glass to the circle, a series of radial lines.

Wet the lines with water.

TAP the glass with your glass cutter, in the centre of the future hole, and keep tapping, until you see cracks propagate to the circle.

Tap, Tap, Tap and make ALL the lines propagate to the circle, and, then tap the circle.

Your Mileage May Vary.....

Steve
marshgre (author)  steveastrouk5 years ago
I like a challenge and I've got a few pieces of scrap glass laying around. So I will probably try once or twice more. I came close yesterday but the glass cracked off in a random direction and my rectangle ended up split in two. I did end up with a nice circle from that one.
Burf5 years ago
You need a diamond saw.
frollard Burf5 years ago
agreed, or a water jet w/ abrasive.
marshgre (author)  frollard5 years ago
I like this answer the best. Mostly because it illustrates the need and usefulness of a machine I would love to have. Plus spending a few hundred thousand dollars for a tool to complete a $200 project sounds like it's just my style ;-)

Of course my wife is skeptical and is now looking at tile samples. I could cut those with a water jet too I guess. But since I can't convince my better half to let me get a sawmill and a dump truck the water jet may be a bit of a stretch.
I never put it online...but I built a crane out of 2x4 lumber to get my couches out of an apartment building so that I didn't have to carry them down the stairs.
marshgre (author)  frollard5 years ago
My brother gave me a washer and dryer but my staircase was too narrow to take them to the second floor of my house (where the laundry room is). So we used a backhoe and lifted them up to the balcony. This was great because:

1 It justified the expense of the backhoe purchase.

2 I got free appliances.

3 It proved that it was a good thing that I hadn't repaired the railing after a tree ripped it off.
There is ALWAYS a positive to come from procrastination + over-spending and over-engineering a response to a problem that hadn't existed prior :D
marshgre (author) 5 years ago
I solved it!

Step 1 Send wife to swim class with kids.
Step 2 Attempt the cut on three pieces of glass.
Step 3 Race off to Home Depot and buy a piece of acrylic.
Step 4 Drill and cut with jigsaw.
Step 5 Install before Wife returns.
Step 6 Don't tell She hasn't picked up on it yet.

As you can see from the pictures of my attempts with glass I came very close before snatching failure from the jaws of success.
IMG_3929.JPGIMG_3930.JPG
He he he.
Nice one ;-)
Steve
caarntedd5 years ago
You can't. I think this is one of those jobs where you will have to employ an expert, unless you have a large supply of glass to practice on.
Re-design5 years ago
I would not try it on my own.

A glass shop can cut it for you but it's expensive. The reason it's expensive is because the tools are expensive and the failure rate is high.