Would someone please post a published book or a competent reference with H Bridge in it?

Every textbook, reference, and manual I have or can find say bridge network so where does H Bridge come from.

I do know that bridge circuits can look like an H the way some people draw the schematic but they are called bridge networks whether they are resistors, diodes, capacitors, transistors, or a mix and look like an H or not.

Other than a hand full of dictionaries and the books I have written and anthologies my works are in on top of this books case, all these books and more that I have are on electronics and none of them say H Bridge.

So I would like to know where H Bridge comes from and please post the book or competent reference.

Joe

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I think you may be right, and that "H" bridge is a neologism, that said, its distinct from the measurement bridge because switching currents flow across the legs, and that is anathema in a measurement bridge.
Josehf Murchison (author)  steveastrouk3 years ago
As far back as I can check this circuit it is called a “full bridge”, until the recent use of H Bridge.

The term Full Bridge and H Bridge are both used in data sheet by Texas Instruments today.

To that end H Bridge is defiantly a neologism.

So Steve gets the best answer.
Josehf Murchison (author)  steveastrouk3 years ago
I think you and iceng have the answer when you put your answers together. H Bridge is a neologism that in all probability has its origins in how the circuit is drawn.

With neologisms expect three things.

Expect neologisms to be challenged for their validity. (Some people will accept them and some people just won’t, I guess that is what you get living in an evolving world.)

You can expect people to not know what you are talking about with neologisms. (I have been in electronics for 44 years and the first time I heard H Bridge my first thought was, “What are you talking about?”).

And last don’t expect neologisms to survive, (In this case push pull circuits already exist, there are a lot of people that draw Bridge circuits like this as well as many people still read books and learn from them. As far as I have searched H Bridge can’t be found in a book, H figure can be found thank you Iceng.)

I wonder if a best answer can be shared and if this neologism will survive?

You know what would be fun have the readers vote for the best answer.

This will make a nice addition to my story plot.

Joe
Bridge Answer 3.bmp
Josehf Murchison (author)  steveastrouk3 years ago
As far as I can tell H Bridge only refers to how you draw the circuit.

Electrically the circuit is a double delta circuit and you analyze them by converting one of the deltas into a Y and then they are a simple series parallel circuit.

Any component in a circuit can be resented by a resistor for the purpose of analysis and testing even a transistor.

Functioning at Q the impedance of a transistor is equal to its emitter and collector impedance.

But that is not why I want to know the origin of H Bridge.

I am a writer and I write science fiction, ghost stories, poetry and so on.

I am in the middle of writing a story and I came across this conundrum I cannot verify H Bridge other than on the net. Now I am Canadian but this is the WWW and just because H Bridge is not a Canadian standard reference doesn’t mean it isn’t a standard somewhere else, I just can’t find it.

Sifi fans are fanatical about details and if you make one tinny mistake and they spot it your life is about to become a living hell until you fix it.

Ever rewrite a 150,000 word book Larry Niven did it was Ringworld he rounded 9.80 meters a second to 10 meters a second to make the math easier.

His fans harped at him until he fixed it, now if it was me I would have told my fans that space debris in the tones strikes the Earth every year most of it specks of dust that we never see and this story takes place so far in the future the mass of Earth has increased so that acceleration of gravity is 10.0 meters a second. Instead of fixing it feed them plausible BS after all it is Science Fiction.

When you write Sifi you walk on egg shells if you make one mistake and your fans spot it first get ready to eat crow.

Joe

Oh and by the way 42 is the alphanumerical sum of, “To Be”.
verence3 years ago
Not sure, if I understand your question, but I think, you're mixing up two different kinds of bridges.

For one thing, there is the electronic bridge that is most often depicted in a diamond pattern like the bridge rectifier (2KBP 3N254 in your schematic). Apart from rectifiers, those bridges are most often used in measurement circuits as the allow to compare the ratio of the four parts by looking at the voltage 'across the bridge'. If this voltage is zero, the parts on the left hand side have the same ratio as the parts on the right hand side (equal voltage dividers). See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bridge_circuit

On the other hand, there is the driver circuit in H-bridge configuration. The configuration allows it to drive a motor or solenoid coil (eg loudspeaker coil) forward AND backward while only having a single supply. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H_bridge for picture and info.
Josehf Murchison (author)  verence3 years ago
That is a push pull circuit or an AB amp some push pull circuits are B amps like the one in this book.

See a book and a creditable source.

In truth, Bridge circuits are double delta circuits and you analyze them by converting one of the deltas into a Y and then they are a simple series parallel circuit.

Calling them a Diamond Bridge is just as viable as calling them H Bridge some people just draw them as an H.

In this Pic the same circuit is drawn two ways so why H bridge and where did it come from because it seems to only exist on the net I can’t find the term H Bridge in any book and I have hundreds of books and access to thousands more.

Joe
Bridge Answer.bmpMagnetic Wire 8.JPGMagnetic Wire 9.JPG
> That is a push pull circuit or an AB amp some push pull circuits are B amps like the one in this book.
Yep, but it is a dual push pull circuit making the H bridge. And it doesn't matter if the AMP is A/AB/C or D class.

> See a book and a creditable source.
Why? I have no problem with the term 'H-Bridge'.

> In truth, Bridge circuits are double delta circuits and you analyze them by converting one of the deltas into a Y and then they are a simple series parallel circuit.
And this is related to the question at hand exactly how?

> Calling them a Diamond Bridge is just as viable as calling them H Bridge some people just draw them as an H.
I only have seen the diamond pattern used for measurement related bridges (and bridge rectifiers that are just easier recognized that way). I only know the term H Bridge from driver circuits.

> In this Pic the same circuit is drawn two ways
No. But I got the point.

> so why H bridge?
Err, well, maybe ... because it looks like the letter 'H'.

> and where did it come from?
From an inventive guy who saw the resemblance between the circuit and the letter H?

> because it seems to only exist on the net I can’t find the term H Bridge in any book and I have hundreds of books and access to thousands more.
And you checked all of them for the term H Bridge? Respect.

Anyway, why do you care? There is no central authority for technical terms. As long as everyone knows what an H Bridge is, who cares where the term came from. And otherwise, just call that thing a full bridge driver. http://www.st.com/web/catalog/sense_power/FM142/CL851/SC1790/SS1556
Josehf Murchison (author)  verence3 years ago
Ok so your answer is someone decided to change the name of push pull circuits to H bridge and who cares.

That is not going to get you a best answer.
Np.
An H driver bridge is a double push pull circuit with the load being suspended in the middle making it suspended from ground.

As the term is widely understood, yes: Who cares where it came from?

> That is not going to get you a best answer.
What? No cookie? Who cares...
Josehf Murchison (author)  verence3 years ago
Thank you for your input.

As far back as I can check this circuit it is called a “full bridge”, until the recent use of H Bridge.

The term Full Bridge and H Bridge are both used in data sheet by Texas Instruments today.

To that end H Bridge is defiantly a neologism.

So I gave best answer to Steve.
Josehf Murchison (author)  verence3 years ago
I think steveastrouk and Iceng have the answer when you put their answers together. H Bridge is a neologism (Newly coined term, word, or phrase, that may be in the process of entering common use.) that in all probability has its origins in how the circuit is drawn.

With neologisms expect three things.

Expect neologisms to be challenged for their validity. (Some people will accept them and some people just won’t.)

You can expect people to not know what you are talking about with neologisms. (I have been in electronics for 44 years and the first time I heard H Bridge my first thought was what are you talking about?).

And last don’t expect neologisms to survive, (In this case push pull circuits already exist, there are a lot of people that draw Bridge circuits like this as well as many people still read books and learn from them. As far as I have searched H Bridge can’t be found in a book, H figure can be found thank you Iceng.)

I wonder if this neologism will survive?
Like this
Bridge Answer 3.bmp
iceng3 years ago
Found this 11 page Portable Document File about H-Bridging
Josehf Murchison (author)  iceng3 years ago
Nice one icemg and only a 4 year old document.

Don't you like how they draw it shaped like a box.

Joe
Every viewpoint is relative !
I-Bridge.jpg
Josehf Murchison (author)  iceng3 years ago
Thank you for your input.

As far back as I can check this circuit it is called a “full bridge”, until the recent use of H Bridge.

The term Full Bridge and H Bridge are both used in data sheet by Texas Instruments today.

To that end H Bridge is defiantly a neologism.

So I gave best answer to Steve.
Josehf Murchison (author)  iceng3 years ago
I like that one
iceng3 years ago
There is a little known Westinghouse SCR Designers Handbook first edition 1963 that is in my possession.

On page 7-44  there is a Figure 7-37  Three-Phase Bridge Converter

Also presented is a Single-Phase Bridge Inverter circuit Figure H .

Given the propensity of the average engineer to speak in acronyms it is no leap to jump
from SPBIC to the ubiquitous H-Bridge designation in common language.                                                                       
Josehf Murchison (author)  iceng3 years ago
Thanks for the book reference that is what I am looking for.

I think you and steveastrouk have the answer when you put your answers together. H Bridge is a neologism (Newly coined term, word, or phrase, that may be in the process of entering common use.) that in all probability has its origins in how the circuit is drawn.

With neologisms expect three things.

Expect neologisms to be challenged for their validity. (Some people will accept them and some people just won’t.)

You can expect people to not know what you are talking about with neologisms. (I have been in electronics for 44 years and the first time I heard H Bridge my first thought was what are you talking about?).

And last don’t expect neologisms to survive, (In this case push pull circuits already exist, there are a lot of people that draw Bridge circuits like this as well as many people still read books and learn from them. As far as I have searched H Bridge can’t be found in a book, H figure can be found thank you Iceng.)

I wonder if a best answer can be shared and if this neologism will survive?

Joe
Bridge Answer 3.bmp
Give it to Steve, my eye sight has been damaged by a virus and I misread the
figure H from 8.
Never the less that is my oldest hand book that shows bridges in what I call
and recognize as H configuration.

When we built inverters with a switch from power to a switch to ground,
a favorite comment was often applied to the circuit as being a microsecond
away from dead short failure,
Then the microprocessor arrived and we could ensure a sufficient dead time
for semiconductor switch-over..


Today you can buy H or half H power modules from electronic suppliers.
Josehf Murchison (author)  iceng3 years ago
Sorry to hear about the eye troubles I’m no stranger to them.

Bummer lost the book reference.

Some people call them half bridge.

Joe
rickharris3 years ago
Again I am not sure your talking about the same circuit configuration as I have in my mind when I use the term H Bridge.

A Diode bridge such as you have shown in your PSU diagram is to me a bridge - this is most commonly a rectifying circuit.

The H Bridge is a transistor configuration use as a motor drive - often in PIC interface circuits as in the illustration below.

http://vamfun.wordpress.com/2012/07/21/derivation-of-formulas-to-estimate-h-bridge-controller-current-vex-jaguarvictor-draft/

Looks like an authoritative reference from the Wiki article on the subject

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H_bridge
H bridge.JPG
Josehf Murchison (author)  rickharris3 years ago
it is the same circuit and it can be drawn like this
Bridge Answer 3.bmp
Josehf Murchison (author)  rickharris3 years ago
People call these circuits H bridge circuits.

The only place that term is used that I can find is on the net.

It is not in any book on electronics I can find.

In books these circuits are called type B and type AB push pull in all text I can find.

So where did H Bridge come from?

Even when you check Wikipeda’s references only one goes to H Bridge and it is a web page.
Bridge Answer 2.gifMagnetic Wire 9.JPG
Ah OK I hadn't seen that but I suspect H bridge motor controller came into being with micro controllers and people transfer the term to anything that looks the same - As you say they are not.
Josehf Murchison (author)  rickharris3 years ago
Yea I checked books on motor controllers they call it a push pull circuit also.

Even books on power inverters call it an push pull AB amp or a push pull B amp or just a push pull inverter circuit.

Makes you wonder EH.
Try this for a library. This is mine. Actually, because the site's clipped it, its about 1/3rd of mine (and the back of the shelves you see too,
Temp-1919795721PhotafPanoramaPicHD.jpg
Josehf Murchison (author)  steveastrouk3 years ago
Mine would be close to that if it was all in one place but I have book cases every where around the house.

I just showed those books because I had the Pic My Ant wanted to know what the books my writing is in looked like and that was one of the picks I sent her.

Joe