Instructables

best adhesive to repair ceramics?

I need to repair a standard ceramic coffee mug. It has broken, very cleanly, into 3 separate pieces.  When complete it needs to be able to withstand typical daily uses i.e. a microwave, dishwasher, boiling water. Ideally the repair will be invisible.
What is the best adhesive  to use?

Picture of best adhesive to repair ceramics?
bryanddom (author) 4 years ago
PC-11 is an epoxy that claims to be non-toxic when dry, although only rated up to 200 deg F.  I know people who have repaired radiators with it.  What do you think? Will I have children with gills if I drink out of this?

http://pcepoxy.com/our-products/paste-epoxies/pc-11.php

Alternately I've seen mention of Elmer's Craft Bond Ceramic & Glass Cement
http://www.elmers.com/GlueGuide/detail.asp?id=78&source=EL&selMaterial1=&selMaterial2=&aid=11

I haven't been able to get any detailed spec.s on this one though.

DustyJ bryanddom3 months ago
"Will I have children with gills if I drink out of this?"

Well, you can hope.

In a more serious note, I wouldn't regularly drink out of it. Epoxy is one of those "kinda harmless" things, not really harmless, but not a glowing horrible monster of hazmat goo either. While curing it's both a cumulative sensitizing agent (don't use bare hands working with it, nor breathe the vapors). And I'm wondering about hormone analog issues or similar problems WRT chronic exposure to the cured product steeping in hot coffee...

Of course you could repair it with epoxy, then line the inside with a known safe coating, if such an animal could be found.
makeithb4 months ago

I default to JB Weld on most ceramic fixes:

http://www.jbweld.com/faqs/

You can also refer to

www.gluehow.com/recommendation/Ceramic/to/Ceramic andhttp://www.thistothat.com/cgi-bin/glue.cgi?lang=en&this=Ceramic&that=Cer amic

PC-11 is a great product and many of the restoration projects in this link (Before and after repair)  were executed with it. It cures harder, thus more "sandable", if in 140 degree F for 5-8 hours. Will soften up if in above 180 degree F and will compromise the repair. Will tolerate expoture to liquid if the repair material is NOT pours. 
 
 Lakeside Pottery Ceramic Restoration Studio  www.renewceramic.com 


Rojasp2 years ago
Anyone suggesting superglue or Krazyglue should have their mouths washed out with cyanoacrylate. What you need is Dap, made by Dow-Corning. It's 100 percent silicone (i.e., the element of sand or glass), will create a barrier to liquid transfer through the break, and will withstand temperatures far above those in a dishwasher or boiling liquid, or any temperatures likely to be in a cup. It's also microwave safe.
It's absolutely nontoxic, and its clear. It should easily hide a clean break except for someone looking for the crack. I used it on a soup bowl a couple years ago or more, and my wife has never even noticed. It's been through the dishwasher and the microwave probably hundreds of times each, and it doesn't leak.
since you raised the chemistry topic: silicone is not the same as silicon.

silicon is a type of element known as a metalloid. when it is accompanied by oxygen it is most commonly referred to as silica. silica can take many different forms in rock forming minerals. Sand and glass are two of the most common forms in which we find silica.

Silicone is a petroleum distillate product, not too much different than cyano-acrylate; cyano-acrylate itself is a petroleum product.

It is a known carcinogen but is commonly formulated for safe use in food handling and food preparing applications.

I think I found what you're talking about:

http://www.dap.com/docs/tech/00000698.pdf

it looks pretty good, and i will try it on your suggestion.

Thanks!
Can you clarify whether the recommended Dap product contains silicone, the known carcinogen, or silicon? My favorite mug broke today, and I would love to repair it and continue using it, but I wouldn't feel comfortable using it to drink from daily if it contains a known carcinogen. Thanks!
Which kind of DAP ? I looked on their site and there are a lot of different kinds.
I think this is the dap you want:

http://www.dap.com/docs/tech/00000698.pdf

your post helped me find the info i needed, so i thought i'd say thanks!

i hope 6 months later is better than never ;p
Lakeside Pottery, A ceramic restoration studio, posted a few step by step tutorials and illustrations (including videos) showing how to repair ceramic objects and where to purchase the epoxies and other ceramic repair related materials. See link below:

http://lakesidepottery.com/Pages/Pottery-tips/How-to-fix-broken-pottery-china-ceramic-lesson-1.htm
See an example below:
broken-moche-vase-after.jpgbroken-moche-vase-before.jpg
Well with this sort of damage there is only one way to go: kintsugi, the old Japanese art of repairing with gold. And since this is unaffordable you should check the invention Lotte Dekker did during a project we did on Repair. It is Bison kintsugi: http://www.platform21.nl/page/5752/nl?lang=en
orksecurity4 years ago
How much will the adhesive cost?

How much will a replacement mug cost?

How much is your time worth, vs. how much satisfaction you'll get out of restoring it?

(Personally, I'd go with "repair it as a display piece, drink out of something else.")
Ditto what these other guys have said. I used regular glass & ceramic epoxy from Home Depot to repair my favorite coffee mug when the handle came off. The bond is very strong, and has stood up to the microwave & dishwasher regularly for the past five years. It is not invisible, and the repair is not in a location where the epoxy comes into contact with my coffee. I would not be comfortable with the idea of drinking hot coffee that had epoxy steeping in it.
Looking at the stuff, I can't see there being much of a hazard. Its not like there'll be much of an area presented to the liquid, and Epoxy isn't a toxic hazard officially.

Steve
Yeah, I can't back that one up with actual science. It's just a vague uneasy feeling.
Unless you use non-domestic epoxies, the epoxies you can readily buy, or the cyano-acrylates ("superglue") will not withstand boiling water for many cycles.

Permabond in the UK supply a superb high temperature epoxy, good to 190C, but that is AFAIR 120 GBP a tube.

There are phenolics that MIGHT do it, but I've not seen them in 0.5mL jars - which is probably all you need. 

Steve
lemonie4 years ago
It's permanently damaged, I wouldn't recommend anything to withstand the uses you describe. If I were having a go I'd use a clear epoxy glue, but I would not be be drinking coffee out of it daily.

L
Kiteman4 years ago
For invisibility, there are types of superglue (CA adhesives) that are intended specifically for ceramic repairs.

I don't know what the adhesive manufacturers would claim, but I would not use hot liquids in it after being fixed, unless the join was clear of the liquid.