does Indium tin oxide reflect inferred? and is it possible to coat glass with it?

does Indium tin oxide reflect inferred? and is it possible to coat glass with it? in Wikipedia, it mentions its transparent, and acts like a "medal-like" mirror. this seems promising, but can i coat a fuse like light bulb with it, so it will reflect the inferred radiation back to the filament, heating it up more? i idea is this will help make light bulbs more efficient.  

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No, it won't help for all the reasons that were explained last time you asked a similar question. You are up against some fundamental thermodynamics.
-max- (author)  steveastrouk6 years ago
why not? have you ever tried? i think its worth a shot. i know its used in capacive touch screens, LCDs, anywhere one would need to have a transparent conductor. reading that page, it looks promising. i just need to find out where i can get some and how to apply it to a glass bulb.
No, I haven't tried, because only a little calculation can show that its really
So calculate how much hotter you can realistically make it, and convert that into increased light output and THEN decide if you can make any difference to the output, and if THAT is worth it, compared to using any other bulb technology.

Then also factor in bulb temperature, and the melting point of ITO, which is only 1500 C.

Steve
-max- (author)  steveastrouk6 years ago
if done right, it will work. how do you know the calculations? CFL contains mercury, and always has a artificial glow to it. LED is vary expensive, directional, and requires good heat sinks. look at how solar ovens work. if the heat builds up enough, no telling HOW mush light i will get out of it before the filament goes bad.

think if i coated a 100W light. i run it at 60W, and still burns at full brightnessd after the heat builds up enough. witch should only be a second.
Are you a professional physicist ?
-max- (author)  steveastrouk5 years ago
no, and what law I'm a going up against? imply improving the efficacy of the light does not mean breaking laws of physics. what my intentions are to reflect the heat back to the filament to help with the heating. because heat will build up on the tungsten, it wont be radiated, im not sure if the glass will get hot, ill need to find out.
anything is possible u just got to be crazy en-of to try it

Now who's asking silly questions?

L
he he.....