loading

how to teach my kid to learn ABC faster?


sort by: active | newest | oldest
lalalaita7 years ago
do projects that begin to incorporate writing.   one of my favorite projects to do with young children is making a map. take a large piece of paper and use cut out shapes and crayons to designate your home and the roads and places around you.  This is a good project to help create a vision of spacial relations and labels will help promote literacy.  :)
However I do believe that children will begin to learn letters, reading, and writing when they are ready- one day it will just be there as long as there is support and access to the information.
Be your child's age and do the alphabet like a 3, 4, 5 etc. would do.  Make a chart of the Alphabet or download one. Sit with the child and read the alphabet slowly like a kid would do.  Even if he/she is not in the mood or even not paying attention.  Make a set time to do it as often as you can and he/she will come around and be interested.  This is very important...BE PATIENT.  They know when you are not and will lose interest.
Kiteman7 years ago
The "Now I Know my ABCs" song is popular because it works.

It's more important to find something that sticks in the long term than for it to happen quickly. 



(At least we know now why Americans pronounce the last letter of the alphabet as zee instead of zed - it's to make it fit the rhyme...)
Now if we can only figured out why so many Americans insist on referring to pale-yellow, mass-produced, flavorless, kidney-filtered lager as beer....
LOL - Kitewife just brought me my Easter egg early - A bottle of St Peter's Cream Stout, one of their Suffolk Gold and a bottle of Adnam's Explorer.
Now there's an Easter tradition I can get behind.
;-)
Not another BEER detour!
Last year, after going birding for a day with my father, we had a small detour one the way home to look at a new distillery.

The detour took longer than the rest of the trip...


Re-design7 years ago
The song fer sure, fer sure!
acidbass7 years ago
 umm each kid has their own learning pace if you force your kid to learn faster than he or she wants to then you could damage their learning capabilities later in life so my advice is to just let the kid take its time but depending on age like is he or she 5 or 6 then it is time to get worried
jeff-o7 years ago
1.  Read to your kid every night.  And during the day, too.  Point to words as you read them.
2.  Give him toys that encourage learning the ABCs - and play with them with your kid!  Tell them which letters they are, every single time.
3.  Point out letters on street signs, product labels, and books.
4.  Have your kid watch you write letters, and explain what you're writing.
5.  During TV time, plunk them down in front of They Might Be Giant's "ABCs"  (for real - my daughter learned a few of her letters from here!)
6.  After a while, start pointing to letters and asking what they are.  If he doesn't know, tell him the right answer and assign an object to go with it - eg. A for Apple.
7.  Perhaps most importantly, don't make it like a classroom.  It should be fun, and it should be unstructured.  The ABCs are all around, it's easy to talk about them all day long without ever having to stop what you (or he) is doing.
NachoMahma7 years ago
.  Same way to teach the kid just about anything - make it fun. Make the alphabet into a game, song, or other interesting activity.
.  Anything other than that depends on the age and ability of your kid.

+1
Find something that your kid likes, i.e. dinosaurs, trucks, airplanes, etc. and customize the learning activities to include the content of interest. For my kid, it was dragons. YMMV.

BobS7 years ago
What age is your kid??  Not every kid is ready for memorizing the alphabet at a set age. Kids like to follow examples, so read books yourself, and their interest will follow...  My stepchild had dyslexia plus ADHD, so reading was very difficult, so difficult, that her attention span did not allow her to view the fruits of her effort. After YEARS, her reading skills developed to the point that she could make sense of an interesting story (thanks Harry Potter!), and she has been reading ever since.