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i want to paint on wood.

I want the paint to be fluid and thick...right now I am using regular craft paint and it is thin and muttled. what do I do? I am trying to learn how to professionally personalize various items using paint. like stools for kids, trunk for kids to take to camp, I know that I am using the wrong kind of paint but don't know what I should be using. any help is appreciated!

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neivadan7 years ago
ya when u paint on wood use your artstic skills and always trust ur intints as simple as that.
oh plus ushould take advice from ur elders probley they ment have a thing or two about ti.
seandogue7 years ago
I agree with origami about the use of primer.

Are you wanting to use thick paint like a textured surface (what one might see from an artist?) If so, there are special paints for that use. Regular paint just won't do it, at least not in my experience. Try an art store for paint appropriate for artistic texturing...although now that i am typing, I *think that DIY stores carry at least some texture paints, which you might make do with if you're clever abou it (or desperate enough)...

If you're just after a nice heavy coat for a "normal" paint job, use multiple coats.

When using latex, a new coat can be applied every few hours, once the previous coat has dried to the touch or is just slightly tacky. For oil-based paints you'll need to wait much longer, perhaps a half day between coats, even if it feels dry, becaus eit tends to sluff easier (ime)...Use a fan to speed the drying process, and allow several days for setup once you've finished coating the item.
Burf7 years ago
For general purpose wood paints, latex enamel paint is a good solution. It is lead free, non-toxic when dry, and the paint fumes are mild  and, in my opinion, not particularly offensive.  Its available in a multitude of colors in flat, satin and gloss finishes and cleans up with water.
For the best finish, good prep is essential; fill,  sand, dust and then wipe down with a tack cloth.  And as origamawolf pointed out, wood should be first primed with a compatible latex primer before applying the top coat.  
Latex enamel paint is available in 1/2 pint, quart, gallon and five gallon containers at almost any store that sells DIY supplies.
origamiwolf7 years ago
When painting on wood, it's a good idea to use a primer.  This is a first coat of material that goes on the wood to help subsequent paint layers stick, and also to help the colour of the paint show up nicely.  Without primer, the colour of the paint and the colour of the wood tend to interfere with each other, and the results look bad.

The type of paint and primer depends on the final use of the object you're painting - eg is it for outdoor or indoor use?  Will it come into contact with water?  There are many brands of paint and primer available, with a different range of prices.  Hardware stores like Home Depot (or equivalent) often have a wide selection of primers and paints suitable for wood.