if standing in a moving boat and jumping straight up in the air; would i land in the boat or in the water?



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It depends... First, where are you standing in the boat? If its near the stern or near the railing at the end, you may end up in the water. Second, is the boat accelerating or at a constant velocity? If the boat is accelerating, it will continue to accelerate while you will not (you will actually begin to decelerate due to air resistance), and again, if you are near the stern (close, close, close) your chances of landing in the water are much more likely. Next, you would have to jump fairly high... not too high, but high enough to clear objects such as the railing, etc. This will also give you more time in the air, away from the accelerating boat, and thus more time to decelerate, making the chances of landing in the water much higher.

The only difference is that if the boat is at a constant velocity, you will not so much have to worry about it accelerating away from under you, but just from your deceleration due to the air resistance.

Hope that helps to answer your question!
rickharris6 years ago
If you jump high and the boat is moving fast then although you start with the same velocity as the boat air drag will effect your body whilst in the air and you will land somewhere behind the boat. If the boat is long this may well be still in/on the boat.
Kiteman6 years ago
If it's a small boat, and your friends are in control of it, you will definitely land in the water...
NachoMahma6 years ago
. What Re-design and kelseymh said, plus, if the boat is moving fast enough, wind resistance will slow you down and you may land behind the boat.
Ditto
you would land on the same spot you jumped from as you are traveling at the same speed as the boat
kelseymh6 years ago
If the boat is going at constant speed, you'll land back in the boat (look up [b]Galilean relativity[/b]). If the boat is accelerating or decelerating, then you'll land either in a different place on the boat, or (if it is small enough) in the water. Again, look up [b]Galilean relativity[/b].
Re-design6 years ago
In the boat. Unless the boat was accelerating very fast and if you jumped really high it might acclerate out from under you.