restaurants make beautiful poached eggs with even edges. how can i do that?

how can i poach an egg?

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glorybe7 years ago
         The answer is poaching rings. They may not be easily purchased these days but they are nothing more than a piece of pipe about one half inch tall. The inside diameter is about two and one half inches but that is not a critical measurement at all. Stainless might be the best metal to use but aluminum should work as well.
        Simply place one quarter inch of water in a flat bottomed pan and place the ring in the pan. When boiling pour the egg into the center of the ring. Cover with a lid so that steam cooks the top of the egg. Water should never cover the top of the egg. Also when you add the lid you will need to turn down the heat or you will get a boil over. You will get a perfectly round, poached egg every single time. Just check every thirty seconds to assure that you don't over cook the egg.
AndyGadget8 years ago
As Steve says, an egg poacher
(Which reminds me, I haven't had a poached egg for YEARS and we've got a poacher in the cupboard. Guess what's for breakfast tomorrow!).
Yeah, but can you make the hollendaise sauce...? ;P
I can! Its easy, if not traditional! You need: • 3 egg yolks • 4 tbsp butter (cut into two 2 tbsp chunks) • 1 tbsp lemon juice • round bottomed sauce pan or smallest pan you have • whisk or fork First break up the egg yolks in the sauce pan. Beat viciously until uniformly golden. Add the lemon juice. Turn on the heat to low. Add the first chunk of butter. As it begins to melt, continue to move the cold butter through the egg. DO NOT WALK AWAY. The idea is to keep the yolk mixture from accumulating too much heat and cooking-- so keep it moving. When the last bit of the first chunk of butter is gone, add the second and keep stirring. You're going to notice the yolk mixture starting to thicken. Show no mercy. When the butter is melted and the mixture feels milk-shake like, remove from heat and serve.
sadhbh8 years ago
one trick that I've heard restaurants use is to poach the eggs in a 'bag' of clingfilm (saran ? wrap) - I've tried it, it's handy: you just line a small cup with a piece of clingfilm, maybe oil the film a bit, and then break the egg into it, twist and tie the top closed, and 'boil in the bag' Apparently restaurants partly cook poached eggs this way, and then chill them in cold water and have them ready for reheating/finishing as they are ordered. It doesn't give them a perfect smooth edge but they do stay together and look homemade :-)
seandogue8 years ago
When I was younger, I remember that one of my friend's moms used to use tuna tins. She'd cut the bottoms out as well as the top lid. she placed them in a frying pan of water and put an egg in each tin.
Hollandaise sauce has always eluded me. The one time I did try was a total disaster. I normally have poached egg on toast simply with salt and pepper. I do like the tuna tin idea - I'll try that.
I hear ya. Mine always turns out like cottage cheese in a sea of butter. Still tastes good, but it looks quite unappealing My pal the professional cook always tells me, "Oh, it's so easy, I don't know why you're having problems..."... I always give him a muttered curse behind his back once I've hung up the phone. ;)
In the UK, we use an egg poacher, looks like a tiny frying pan, with little cups for the eggs mounted in a tray which sits over the water filled pan. Cover with the lid, and steam for a few minutes. Perfect shapes.
Ours lives in the corner cupboard with all the other kitchen crap we never use :P
We throw them out periodically, but I'd swear they breed.
rickharris8 years ago
Use a cooking ring in frying pan with just simmering water
Joe Martin8 years ago
Boil water with a good slosh of white vinegar in, Use a rod or something and start a spin going in the water. Take the rod out and now crack an egg in, Cook for three minutes. Remove from water and eat.