upcycle/recycle pillows?

Is there something I can do with old bed pillows besides throw them out?  I am told to buy new pillows every 6 months, but what a waste, not to mention all those pillows going to the landfill.

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iceng2 years ago

Two more ways to demite those huge marshmallows .... 1] Compress in a vacuum bag and freeze for a few days.... 2] Expose to a refreshing Ozone atmosphere in a plastic bag overnight and let air out 4 hrs.

Ozone has a 30 minute half life.

Ozone is activated oxygen Q3 and breaks down to O2 oxygen.

Ozone is poison because it grabs a red blood cell and wont let go diminishing the transport mechanism that feeds our organs.

Asthmatics react badly and instantly to Ozone.

Ozone Clears All Smells except Cat urine by completing the normally slow oxidation process in a hurry.

seandogue2 years ago

Six months seems a bit germphobic. I buy new pillows when they wear out, not when a marketing psychologist tells me it's time to do so.

If, like most of us, you use relatively common pillows (ie, not 100% eider-down or other exotic$$), you don't live in a disease treatment facility, and you don't have weird tropical diseases (ie, you're basically like everyone else, just someone who occasionally gets sick) they're washable and with proper washing can last three or four cycles before they lose their shape enough to warrant replacement.

When you wash them (ideally by them selves or in pairs, but not with other clothes) , add a little bleach and vinegar as a gen purpose disinfectant, use the gentle cycle to reduce clumping in the synthetic fiber mass (the idea here is to thoroughly permeate them with the disinfectant agents, not to batter them into submission) and wash them on the HOT/HOT cycle, just as you might for white socks. (if you have cute patterns on the pillows themselves, shrug... it's your choice whether to err on the side of fashion of function. I opt for health, ie function/ Pillow cases are for fashion, not pillows)

When you dry them, dry them by themselves and a couple tennis balls or rolled up pairs of socks (helps to refluff them), using the hottest cycle that the machine offers. (ie, don't use one of the settings like permapress that limits temperature) and dry them *thoroughly* (I do so until I start to smell them "cooking" if you know what I mean.. so hot that you have to let them cool before handling)

this slightly overdrying at high temp will help rid you of any leftover, stubborn lifeforms (mites, etc.) that may be evident depending on your locale, your pets, your friends/partner/children/etc, your habits, or otherwise.

bodie1 (author) 2 years ago

Vyger.....I actually heard that on a television show called "The Doctors". My initial reaction was not to believe it, either. Glad I'm not alone in that. I also use my pillows for years. Thanks for responding to my question.

iceng2 years ago

Breaking in a new pillow is not easy but every lustrum you gotta do it...

Use your pillow till the batting inside wears out and no longer properly supports your head as it should. Once worn out you can use the batting for other things like stuffed animals. You can clean and reuse the cloth in a quilt or other sewing projects if it's not too worn.

Vyger2 years ago

I find myself thinking "Who told you that?" because I never heard of such a thing. As far as I know pillows can be used for as long as they hold together. Many can be washed and I know they can also be dry cleaned.

If the idea behind throwing them out is to help control things like dust mites then just cleaning them would work fine. For that matter hanging them up outside when it is bellow 0 will kill most everything in terms of insects and such.

If you insist on changing them (I wonder was that advice from someone working at Bed, Bath and keep the money flowing?) the old ones could be used for a lot of things. Pet beds comes to mind right off.

Do you throw out your mattresses every six months too?

My daughter has a favorite pillow that she has used for years. In fact she takes it everywhere with her. She and a friend went to Europe recently and her pillow went with her, and came back with her too.