what are the part numbers of the components used to make the worlds smallest shocker?

hello,
in plasmanas instructable, how to make the worlds smallest electronic shocker, he does not mention anywhere the part numbers of the components, and only asumes that all camera components are the same, which i have now discoverd are not.
anyways, recently i have built this tiny shocker 5 times, 2 times i used no solder as i was puzzled as to why it wouldnt work, all 5 times it didnt work.
now, recently i discoverd that the 5 pin transformer used has 200-300 ohms of resistance between pin 4 and 5, and i have discoverd, that every single transformer i have pulled from a camera, does not, wheras infact it has 0.4 ohms. now unless his results are innacurate, this tells me that his transformers are totally different to all of the ones i have. and i have quite alot, even ones from polaroid cameras, supposedly the only ones that actually work.

now, what i want to know, so i can get them on ebay, what are the part numbers or serial numbers of the transistor and the  5 pin transformer

it seems impossible to harvest the correct ones from anything other than a single type of polaroid camera sold apparently only in america as luck would have it.

otherwise, if no-one knows what the part numbers are, are there any other types that would work?

iceng6 years ago
How about 20,000 Volts very low current.

All it takes is a larger coin, A left and right leather
soled shoe.

In the dry winter, scuff your shoes on a rug and
you will draw a 2.5 cm arc to any conducting object ( person ).

They get a static shock !
You don't because your holding the coin.
It takes about 20,000V to make a 1 inch spark.
CameronSS6 years ago
now, recently i discoverd that the 5 pin transformer used has 200-300 ohms of resistance between pin 4 and 5

Where did you "discover" this? For a tiny transformer, 0.4 ohms seems more reasonable across a coil.

Pretty much all of those transformers are practically identical, there are undoubtedly thousands of part numbers that would get you one that should work.

Check your build for other potential errors -- backwards diode, cooked the transistor while soldering, etc.