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would aluminum be a good material to make a smoker out of?

I was going to build a smoker and was wanting to know if aluminum would withstand the heat and be very relliable. would it hold too much heat or maybe not enough to keep at a particular temperature

sgtmike6 years ago
No, unless you can obtain thick aluminum. For a smoker to be efficient it has to be able to maintain the desired temperature. If you plan on using the smoker for conventional items, like ribs and brisket, then you will need to be able to maintain a temperature of around 250. Depending on the size and thickness of your material it may take much more fuel to hold this temperature for long periods of time. Steel would be a much better material to use except it will be heavier and subject to rust, but you could always use wheels and high temperature paint.
yentiw7 years ago
You're better off using a food grade stainless steel . Find a food grade stainless 55 gal drum that has been used for syrup . The other issue have is temperature. Most smoking is done around the 100 degree F. temp. zone. Get a good book on smoking at the library or book store. It's easier to be successful at smoking when you use some tried and proven techniques.

Good luck.
 I once read a paper which made a link between aluminium in foodstuffs and Alzheimers. Primarily the source seemed to be cooking utensils. Given there should be no direct contact here I'm not sure it would pose a problem, but who knows.
Yes, if you can acquire and work with a decent grade of aluminum. The rest can be worked out in engineering. The metal is very forgiving with brief exposures to high-temperatures (as long as it's thick enough), but you'd be best off separating your source of heat (wood, charcoal, propane, etc) from the aluminum. Do that by installing a smaller steel container for the heat source. The question of holding heat or not is answered by ventilation, thickness, quantity of heat produced, and even the shininess of the inside surface. Personally, I'd go with iron or steel. It'd be cheaper and more resilient.