Amazing Family of DIY Pirates Cross Atlantic Ocean in Raft Made from Garbage!

This is actually old news at this point, but it's so awesome that I think it deserves some attention on Instructables.

A unique family called the Neutrinos built a raft from garbage and scraps found on the streets of New York City, perfected their design during numerous trips along the coast, and then during the summer of 1998 spent 60 days floating it across the Atlantic in 20ft seas while fending off swirling currents and heart attacks!

Needless to say, the story warranted some further investigation, upon which I learned that these empowered adventurers have built many rafts over the past 20 years. The children of the family were born in Mexico and raised in the circus. The more I read about their story, the more interested and excited I become.

Check out the details at their extensive website - The Floating Neutrinos where they write about the other rafts they have built, brain reprogramming, and about their newest project: The Vilma B, a floating 128' orphanage housing up to 25 children!

National Geographic TV featured their home-made a movie about their journey across the Atlantic, and a new movie about the family is on the way. Watch the trailer here.

If you don't have time to dig through the entire site, you can check out the condensed summary of it all at http://www.paulsorganic.com/most-fascinating.htm

If anyone knows more about these people please reply - I can't stop reading about their adventures and getting exciting about floating somewhere myself!

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Patrik9 years ago
Very cool! Is this Tim's long lost family? ;-)
Kiteman9 years ago
Wow, what amazing people!
Looks like something out of Water World.
noahw (author) 9 years ago
Still can't stop reading about these people...

They have plans to sail from San Francisco to China for the 2008 Olympics!

More on that story at NPR.
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=12295361