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Book cover Hinge

Hey all. First time poster here (second attempt, since Instructables stopped responding the first time) so hopefully I am posting in the appropriate place.

I have in mind a leather-book-style cover for my tablet that I'm very excited to work on. However, I would like to use friction or torque hinges to position the cover at any angle  from the spine in a 180 degree radius and have it stay there, similar to the screen of a laptop rotating around the hinge. I've included a picture that shows the basic design that I'm aiming for, though the hinge itself doesn't need to be ornate.

Unfortunately, I don't really know where to find such a thing. I've looked on various furniture hardware sites and taken a trip to the local hardware/home improvement stores, but I haven't found anything that matches what I'm looking for. Common small brass butt hinges would be ideal if they had friction/torque properties to them, but I can't seem to find anything like that. I've never looked for specific hinges before though, so for all I know they've been right in front of my and I didn't realize what they were.

Does anyone know where I can find such hinges, or can someone offer up an alternative solution? Perhaps there is a way to add friction to simple hinges bought from a hardware store. Thanks in advance for pointers/advice.

Picture of Book cover Hinge
wireframewolf (author) 3 years ago

What quick responses! I will get a few hinges and try both methods. Thanks for the advice guys :)

caitlinsdad3 years ago

You can knock out the hinge pin and bend it a bit and force it back in. On non-door hinges, both ends may be mushroomed out or hammered so they stay in place which you will have to grind off or hacksaw one end to get out. Push out with a nail, metal rod or pin chisel. Good luck.

Kiteman3 years ago

Since many hinges are just a metal plate wrapped around a pin, my first inclination would be to close that wrapped metal tighter - crimp it, or even just flatten it slightly with a mallet, or by nipping it tightly in a vice (between blocks of wood, to prevent marking the metal).