Brain Doctor Uses Cordless Drill to Remove Tumors

A British doctor is in the news for using a cordless drill, a Bosch model, to drill into patients' heads and remove tumors in a Ukrainian hospital. While cordless drills are fantastic things it's surprising to see brain surgery as one of their uses. Now if only Bosch would put that on the package.

Minutes later the team of doctors, including one of Britain's most eminent brain surgeons, begins to break into the skull of their fully conscious patientœ with a £30 Bosch PSR960 handy-man's cordless drill.

Amazingly, and despite the low-voltage tool running out of power halfway through the process, Dolishny's operation is a success, with his tumour skilfully excavated at the hands of Henry Marsh.

The procedure, captured as part of a documentary to be screened on BBC2 later this month, was a routine triumph for Marsh, who regularly takes time off as a consultant at St George's hospital in south London to travel to Ukraine and save lives despite having access only to primitive tools.

Also great is this list of makeshift ideas at the bottom of the article:

- In 1995 two doctors on a flight from Hong Kong to Britain operated on a woman with a collapsed lung using a scalpel, a knife and fork and a coathanger to push in a catheter.

- In Iraq in 2004, an American medical journalist removed a bullet from a marine's head with a drill used to put up a tent.

- In 2003 Aron Ralston, an American climber, cut off his arm with a penknife after it became trapped under a boulder in Utah.

- The following year Ines Ramirez Perez, a Mexican, delivered her son by caesarean section with the help of three stiff drinks and a kitchen knife.

Link
via Neatorama

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Goodhart9 years ago
Could he possibly be considered a real "bore" LOL
I'm not sure which is more painful--fully conscious brain surgery or that pun.
Well, let's see: there are not nerves "in" the brain, so it, in itself, feels no pain at all..... ;-)
Actually, in many brain operations, the skull is opened under local anaesthetic so that the surgeon can talk to the patient whilst furtling about in his brain. It is the easiest way to make sure you are working on the right bit, and not damaging other areas.

Far_Side002.jpg
In his Prehistory of the Far Side book, Gary Larson commented that those were the fattest doctors he'd ever seen. :-D

Goodhart: Shut up.

No, really, shut up.

:-P
We are very similar to the song bird's brain in the respect (mentioned that before in another thread) Our link to song birds...
Kiteman9 years ago
Old news, Fungus - normal powertools have been part of the surgeons' toolkit for years.

My grandmother was Matron of our local hospital, and had a Stanley hand-drill that had been thrown out when the surgeon got a new electric Black and Decker.
fungus amungus (author)  Kiteman9 years ago
Sure, they've been used for a while. It's still surprising to many that they are still used. Like leeches.

Funny you should point that out since this is an article about a British doctor and this was written up in a British paper.
What got me was an operation I once saw on TV - the doctor used an ordinary lump hammer and a cold-chisel to reshape somebody's facial bones. When my father wrecked his shoulder (came off his mountain bike, aged 61), he had to have keyhole surgery, and they poked a chisel in through the hole to chip scar tissue off the bone.
If I saw a surgeon with a meat cleaver, I do believe I would get up and make a hasty retreat to the nearest exit :-)
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