Instructables

CO2 chemical sensor

hi everybody, im currently doing a project on CO2 chemical sensor. So what im supposed to do now is to know how it works, and then eventually make them. I am trying to find websites that sell them, and buy it from them. Then me and my supervisor will dismantle them, and learn how it works. anyone know which websites sells them? and how does it works? If there are links to learn/read more about CO2/H20 chemical sensors. Please do post them here too. Thanks all.

wathell (author) 5 years ago
hey guys, i cant seem to find companies that sell co2 CHEMICAL sensor on the net. Most of them are not chemical sensor. Is there any recommendation? I would prefer the company to be close to singapore as much as possible. thanks again guys. appreciate it
lemonie5 years ago
CO2 absorbs very strongly in the infra red around 2350 wavenumbers.

Here's a nice page on sensors:
http://www.delphian.com/infrared%20sensors.htm

L
As in make a chemical based sensor yourself?

Em, I remember a few ways we could prove it was CO2 in the bottle, one of the products of calcium carbonate gets a white precipitate when CO2 bubbles through it.

Universal indicator would change a tiny bit as CO2 is slightly acidic when dissolved in water...

Please note I haven't been in chemistry in three and a bit years, I've forgotten things...
wathell (author)  killerjackalope5 years ago
ok thanks for the info dude! but is there any other methods to do it anyone? Another question is that are those sensors that use infra-red to sense for CO2. Are they counted under chemical sensor? thanks alot!
. Most light-based sensors use the transmissivity/opacity of the sample to operate. Going by your description, I'd guess CO2 is opaque to UV. If this is the case, you should be able to easily build your own.
Whole definition's a bit hazy but I don't really know too much about how that kind of sensor actually functions so I don't know where it'd fall under.

There are tonnes of ways to detect CO2 using chemicals, anything that has a visible reaction with it could be worked in to a sensor, though maybe not a particularly practical one...