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Cockcroft–Walton High Voltage Power Supply

Greetings!

I have wanted to begin experimenting with high voltages recently and have already collected a series of projects that I would like to conduct. The only issue is that of my high voltage power supply. I have not the funds or resources to buy into a NST or MOT system and ended up looking for alternatives. I at first tried the ignition coil route that ended in failure and have now moved on. My question is, will a Cockcroft–Walton generator be able to run say, a tesla coil, jacob's ladder, or even a farnsworth fusor given that the necessary voltage is outputted from the multiplier. 

Kind of between a rock and a hard place here, Thanks anyway!

I have done my fair share of high voltage experiments and can tell you for anything serious you will need a serious power supply.
For example my biggest tesla coil was running on close to 3kW...

If you just started with HV experiments get a few MOT's to run in series, there is plenty of info out there on how to wires MOT's so they provide high power levels without blowing your house fuse.
For anything below a neon transformer, the old style, is recommended.
Don't use the modern electronic ones as the high frequencies will mess with other experiments.
A jacobs ladder is fine but to power a tesla coil you want a standard transformer not a switch mode power supply.
You main problem with a CW generator is the output current and the fact that you won't be able to get a stable output under load.

Qcks1 year ago

It all really depends on the voltage tolerances of the components used.
10 kv capacitors and diodes exist, and that's around the range of a tesla coil, especially if you start multiplying 10 kv a few times.

I forsee problems with this though. If cost is a barrier, high voltage capacitors and diodes aren't necessarily cheaper then Transformer systems.

I mean... buying old microwaves is actually the best way to go about this... since you get a MOT and a high voltage capacitor, AND the high voltage discharge diode. You can get an onld microwave in the US for around $40.00. Buying each of those components online through EBAY, the cost would be around $50.00, not including shipping.

Toga_Dan1 year ago

When funds are really low, a kite and a key... worked for Franklin.

Seriously, tho, a neon sign transformer or bug zapper are a good 1st stage.

Kiteman1 year ago

Try talking to these chaps:

http://www.extremeelectronics.co.uk/