Instructables

Fan made Iron Man suit is pretty freakin' great

Anthony Le is such a fan of Iron Man that he built his own War Machine outfit. Based on concept sketches from before Iron Man 2 hit theaters, Le's suit has a motorized faceplate that flips up and down and a spinning Gatling gun on his shoulder. It's an amazing build and took Le a month to make at a cost of $4,000. Great job!

Le, a fitness consultant, studied some concept sketches of the suit posted on the Internet. He used thin, high-impact urethane for the armor, cutting it into plates and joining them with some 1,500 rivets and washers. He sculpted a clay helmet mold and then used a liquid resin mix to create the final product. But that was just cosmetic work. He also added a small servo motor that opens the faceplate, as in the movie, and built a gun out of pipes and a motor. LEDs in the eyes and chest-plate further add to the illusion.

You Built What?! A Real Iron Man Suit



Picture of Fan made Iron Man suit is pretty freakin' great
tumidaj1 year ago
Good job! :) I like this
Either way, this is one helluvan awesome suit! Astounding!
tk10554 years ago
(removed by author or community request)
Man that guys seems like a total jerk now. also explains why he didn't want to share the way he made the suit. Probably the suit has many faults itself but he covered it up or something....
If you'd like, I have some experience with armor making. The suit appears to be riveted metal, likely aluminum sheeting. For cutting he likely went on the rpf, or 405th (more likely the former, but the latter is a dedicated armor building site) and obtained pepakura files for the suit. From there it was an easy matter of scaling, cutting out the paper files, then using them as stencils to cut out the aluminum sheets. A simple air rivet gun will hold it together nicely.

I don't consider myself skilled enough to use the RPF, but 405th has a lot of introductory tutorials on armor making. Most importantly though, they have the ability and the ground support to blow this guys suits out of the water. Honestly, I've built a better ironman suit than his and it's my third one.
He photoshops the hell out of his pictures
tk10553 years ago
One of his ex-buddies has come forward and has given the costume world the skinny on how these suits were done.

First off, the helmet was NOT made by Lee, It was made by Nate, who was a friend of his, and Lee has since stolen the mold from the individual and has sold substandard copies from it.

Second, the suits are not made from any "high impact urethane" they are indeed made from rubbermade trash cans available at any walmart. $4000 dollars to make that is a lot of bunk. Master Le learned of this armor method on The Dented Helmet, and is not the originator of the idea.

Third, Master Lee is a known rip off artist as is seen here
http://www.therpf.com/f24/has-masterle-cheated-you-96508/
http://www.therpf.com/f9/masterle-iron-man-sales-issue-thread-93282/
http://www.cosplay.com/showthread.php?p=3629836#post3629836
http://www.therpf.com/f24/behind-cosplay-secrets-unveiled-108995/
BillBiker4 years ago
Would be a GREAT kids costume for upcoming halloween!!! Congrats and very awesome job!
that is bad @$$
Honus4 years ago
It's pretty neat. Anyone wanting to make their own Iron Man suit should check out this place- http://www.siwdat.com/
I  wouldn't mind an 'ible just for the minigun!  :P
Seriously, though, that is pretty freaking awesome.
Here you go- http://www.restrainingbolt.com/tutorials/pages/minigun/minigun_tutorial.html
The minigun shouldn't be too hard, in theory you could make most of it in silver painted pvc pipes that are glued together - for the rotation you could use a small DC motor or a servo depending on the rotation type :3

This guy did an amazing job though!
zascecs4 years ago
Pretty damn good...
prodo1234 years ago
Too much free time?
fungus amungus (author)  prodo1234 years ago
BZZZT! Wrong question.

"Too much free time" is a common snipe against those who have done something by those who haven't. When the average American spends 153 hours a month watching TV you could say that about anyone.
That's one comeback i have to remember! I usually just reply with "i did it because i could" it's the ultimate reason.
prodo123 Eirinn4 years ago
BZZZT! Wrong answer. I'm not American, and I certainly do not watch 153 hours a month of TV. I have school to worry about...
fungus amungus (author)  prodo1234 years ago
You're missing the point. It's not about time, but priorities. Many people I know with very busy lives have also made time to do some amazing things because they wanted to do it.
The sort of person who makes the original comment usually misses the point :-/
It's not making money?! What a waste of time.
Point exactly. It's sorta useless, all you do is wear it. You can't really do anything with it.
But be extremely proud of yourself and he could sell that for n known amounts of money.

There's more to life than money ,money doesn't matter when you're dead.
 I'm afraid that is the same viewpoint that many take about knex projects.  I'm sure there is some Latin phrase to describe this situation.
.  Are you thinking of knexus tempus wastus?
i mean, knex projects don't really take that long and people usually have the pieces already. So virtually the cost is $0 and the time taken is around, 1-2 hours? and the guns actually shoot, some shoot BBs, unlike the gatling on that suit.
"Usually"?  Only if they purchased them.  Oh, wait, sorry, their parents purchased them, so you're right, the cost is zero.  The time taken is a couple of hours, and the result?  Worth exactly what it cost.
still, better than spending 4 grands and a month building this. Would you rather spend that much on a useless suit, or zero dollars and a couple hours on a useless gun? Pretty much they're both toys.
Looks like I was right in the first place.  Have a nice day.
.  <snicker>
sure the suit looks a lot better. but no ones willing to pay 4 grands for it (except extreme comic book fans)
.  There is only one suit, how many buyers do there need to be? Seems to me that just one would be enough. I'm guessing that, as long as the money is green, whether or not the buyer likes comic books is unimportant to the seller.
i meant the parts you need to build the suit. No one would pay 4 grand for them, not to mention a month's worth of time gone by.

And I think the seller would care if the buyer was planning to light it on fire and get rid of it once and for all.
> No one would pay 4 grand for them, not to mention a month's worth of time gone by.
.  Isn't that stance rather difficult to maintain when someone has done that? Whether or not you or I think the project is worthwhile is unimportant.
.
> And I think the seller would care if the buyer was planning to light it on fire...
.  What would lead you to believe that? If, as you speculate, he's not doing it for personal satisfaction, why would he care what the buyer did with it?
ugh. tired of this "thread". Let's just say that you have your views, and i have mine.
.  Woot! You do get it!
Eirinn prodo1234 years ago
As i remember a few months back some nut bought a specially shaped cornflake for more than 5000$ off ebay, flew in and collected it himself.
See, there's more to life than money. 
Eirinn prodo1234 years ago
I'm not sure you get the point of creativity and project based solutions. As i see it you only see the end result, which, while pretty impressive probably hasn't been the point all along.
In most cases the evolution of the project is the reward itself, not the goal. This guy has probably learned a lot by doing this and enjoyed every second of it. While it may seem useless to you please think about the following:

I've had a little hobby for electronics for months and i've learned quite a lot by building small funny projects. I never thought i would use it for anything - ever, other than maybe fix a broken tv remote.
Well i couldn't have been more wrong - a few months ago i was about to go down with stress because i couldn't find an internship spot for my education. It was impossible, i couldn't find anything (we kinda have a shortage). Then suddenly a solar cell company was searching for a web developer with, get this, "an interest for electronics and how they work". I got the spot almost immediately and it let to a tight knit collaboration project that not only saved my arse in terms of internship location, but also has future potential (read: money).

I'd really like to stress out that the goal probably wasn't the point of this project to begin with (i don't know the guy, but that's how it usually works). The process itself has given him a shatload og new knowledge that can be put to use in multiple situations (repair, production, services and customizing to name a few).
The goal has given him widespread fame and support, he's helped hospitalized kids and most likely he's won -something- off the cosplay prizes.
The fame itself can be good for him if he's searching for a job, sure no-one is looking to hire a guy dressed in an ironman suit - however just him doing this can make an employer say "damn that guy got patience and creativity and he fits the job description  - just the guy i need i my company).

I suggest you go have fun with your knex gun now, i'm sure someone will be pleased looking at it over webcam :)
 Luke, did you feel that? It seemed like a thousand souls on the Knex homeworld were annihilated and let out a collective *groan*.  
Indeed, even the bucket of them I have forgotten in my closet felt the sting...
Sorry but that suit's so much better than anything you can make out of knex. The only thing that I've seen that comes close it that mitre saw.
.  I think she forgot to append </sarcasm> to her msg. :)  Maybe not.
.  This is a DIY site and most ppl do things for the fun of doing them. Not many here do it for the money (and few of those that do are making a living at it). "Because I can" really is a very common motivator amongst Iblers.
.  I wouldn't spend the time, effort, and money to build the Iron Man suit, but it's still a very cool project and took a considerable amount of creativity and skill to accomplish.
> I think she forgot to append </sarcasm> to her msg. :)
 
Oh! Yeah. Thanks for pointing that out. I'm still not fluent in Stupid.

.  You used to be a nice kid ... until you started hanging around me. :)
>sobs<
 >pats reassuringly on the back
Don't worry, to some of us you will always be nice :D
fungus amungus (author)  prodo1234 years ago
I think you missed the sarcasm there. Besides, your first point was about time, not money. But if you want to talk about that, the answer is the same: priorities. He wanted to make an excellent costume and did.

As far as not being able to do anything with it, you're completely wrong. He's gotten attention for his work on the Internet and in a magazine. According to him he's also been at a movie premiere and visited kids in a hospital to cheer them up. He's also won an award (see video above) and had a lot of fun at conventions.

Sorry you have this attitude towards having fun and making things. You can't really do anything with it.
Your very right Fungus.....he can do alot with that wonderful costume and make what it cost him to build it PLUS more just by going to conventions with contests in them with cash as prizes....who knows someone may also wish to pay him to make them one maybe in another color who knows. But costuming is big money esp if you can produce something with such great detail. Spending your time wisely and doing what you want is how we've gotten the best inventions to make our lives easier.
Yep.
I agree with this point.

"Time is to all people the same but how that person choses to spend it is up to him"

What one man calls a timewaste is another mans hobby.
So this guy wanted to make an ironmansuit and another man wanted to go to church or watch tv or study something they are interested in.

I generrally use this as an argumentation. Most people don't have a good comeback on it. (ofcourse someone is going to prove me wrong and do a great comeback but I look forward to it :D)
If people listened to everyone who said that we'd still be living in caves hitting each other with sticks.
 Seriously I have done the math and tests I could add to it and make it fly as well as put motors on the joints and be able to power it and fly even better... but I ran out of funding on the tests... at least the math holds strong
 if I told you I could make him fly would you believe me or be interested?
nocturnalin4 years ago
That is definitely awesome!!  ...UMMMMM.. But now what?
Vynash4 years ago
O.o
XOIIO4 years ago
Holy crap! I want one! That is so cool!
aeryn214 years ago
hah!  Le's a pretty cool kid and, albeit having a bit of an ego due to his iron man work, is my current cosplay idol.  We were actually right next to each other in the Starfest contest lineup, and as soon as i saw he was in my division, i relinquished any chances of winning (I was Madame de Pompadour from Doctor Who).  while he doesn't really show off his construction technique to the greater public, he does show off to his friends sometimes.  i got to see a bit how the whole thing works.  its way shiny.


jeff-o aeryn214 years ago
Then tell us!!!  Please??
Holy cow.. that's impressive..
bowmaster4 years ago
I saw this in PopSci magazine. I didn't know he made it freehand, I assumed he used CNC or a laser cutter.
Unfortunately, Le has refused to comment on how he made any part or piece of his project on every forum he has posted pictures to. He will however be featured in Popular Mechanics in June and reveal some of his techniques. Hopefully we can learn a little bit there.
fungus amungus (author)  Haunted Spider4 years ago
It was for PopSci, not PopMech, and that article is linked above. The only info is that the suit is made from "thin, high-impact urethane."

After posting this, I read more about the suit in forums and there is certainly a lot of drama about the sharing of ideas. Personally, I think that sharing is wonderful especially since the true secret sauce here is the craftsmanship and dedication. That can't be easily copied by anyone.
Thanks for the correction. I didn't realize the magazine article had been released. I missed that above.
 
It is unfortunate that he did not reveal more information. I agree that sharing an idea is a great way to tell about the dedication it took to create such a masterpiece. I have created costumes myself, not to that degree, but I always enjoyed telling people how I did it as it was a sense of pride for what I accomplished and I loved hearing suggestions to make it better.
I don't see the point in keeping such information private unless you're planning to sell it commercially.  He could immortalize himself by describing the "Anthony Le Method" of armor fabrication.
jeff-o4 years ago
Oh, I hope he took lots of photos of the process!  Quick!  Someone contact him and tell him to write an instructable.
fungus amungus (author)  jeff-o4 years ago
I read more about the suit after posting this and found out that Le, the creator, isn't too keen on posting info about how he makes his stuff so I wouldn't be too optimistic.
Kryptonite4 years ago
I broke the link!
Kaiven4 years ago
 The detail... just.. look at it...
So shiny, so beautiful...
Mr.Sanchez4 years ago
BIG BOYS TOYS...
teyson4 years ago
 Amazing!!! I want one!!!
kcls4 years ago
Pretty awesome. I like the rotating gun barrel and how the mask goes up and down.
njschott4 years ago
That is awesome! The amount of detail in that is crazy.
M.C. Langer4 years ago
HOLY SH...!!!!  IS THE MORE MOTHERF... THING IN THE WORLD!!!

Sorry, but IT'S AWESOME!!!!!!!!!!!!!