Instructables

Got An Anvil, W00T!... Now What

I was given a 2ft hunk of I beam for my bday (yesterday). Now what? I've got loads rebar, a nice steel bar pinched from a printer, this slab of steel 6inX1.5inX1/4in, and a big charcoal bbq pit. Any ideas for projects or on firing up the pit to get it hot enough? And how much fuel? Thanks!

royalestel6 years ago
How about getting a second chunk of I-beam, and sealing the two together with peanut butter and gunpowder. Then see how high you can blow the sucker! (It's a classic gunpowder game.)
I don't get it. Sounds fun.
KentsOkay (author)  royalestel6 years ago
Umm... no, I kinda need the piece i have....
Oh, it wouldn't destroy the anvils at all. Just blows one high in the sky and then it drops down with a thud (don't stand near the anvil when setting it off).
For this to work I think you need the cavity in the bottom of your anvil from where they forged the base. My Fischer is much flatter on the bottom than a forged anvil. The guy I learned from was there when someone did this and the weld between the body and the base of the anvil broke. The body fell over onto the ground and the base went on to nearly kill someone. (Missed by about three feet, or so he says.)
Heh - I just had to see this. Here's a video I found:

http://www.veoh.com/videos/v1470852BbcgRfKj

Given how high that anvil flew into the air - can you imagine what would have happened if something had gone wrong, and it went sideways?
 lol
Heh. Makes me laugh every time.
It looks like they milled that first one (the one with the plexiglass or whatever on the bottom) out or something to give it more of a kick, but yeah, that's pretty much it. The angle of the force equals the angle of the reaction thing pretty much keeps if from going sideways, but in the case I mentioned, a lot of the force went one way early on and well....
texasratt124 years ago
Load it with gunpowder and launch it into the air lol
Austringer6 years ago
Google "break drum forge". I've seen some nice stuff come out of these and they aren't that hard to build.
jtobako6 years ago
Get a chunk of steel pipe and a hairdryer or other small fan (or air compressor, if you can turn down the volume) so you can push some air under your charcoal. A couple of CLAY bricks are useful for limiting the size of your fire (cement and some ordinary rocks have a tendency to snap, crackle and pop-throwing bits of shrapnel and fire around when heated). Some people like a big fire, some small. Scrap wood works, but has to be loaded in time to create a bed of charcoal that does the heating of the metal.

Keep a bucket of water handy. If it's plastic, expect to melt threw the side at least once with the hot metal. Keep it clean so that you can cool burns that you WILL get.

The I-beam will be noisy, and may tend to bend out of shape if you don't keep the hammering in the middle (over the web/center bar).

Take a look at iForge for ideas on what to make, but first find out what you can do : ) Hammer the rebar into a knife or something. Knife shapes are simple(ish) and you can easily see what you are working toward and how the metal starts moving when you hit it.
KentsOkay (author)  jtobako6 years ago
OK thanks, woulda leaf blower work? It's rather low powered.
A leaf blower is too big-unless you want to chase burning embers across the yard : ) Even the hairdryer is too big, but it's easy to not use some or most of the air. I use a tiny sliver (less than 1 inch uncovered) of a 6 inch blower or a 4 inch computer fan slowed down with a speed control at my teacher's big forge.
LinuxH4x0r6 years ago
Happy birthday! Sorry I don't have any ideas at the moment.
KentsOkay (author) 6 years ago
*cough*bump*cough*
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