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National Science Bowl teams used my Trebuchet for a competition

I received an awesome comment.

A high school teacher used the plans for my Quick'n'Dirty Trebuchet as a lunchtime competition project for teams competing in the National Science Bowl.

The teacher made up kits of the parts: masking tape, dowels (I used chopsticks), paperclips, toothpicks, string, a binder clip and a weight. The teams then had to assemble it and held a throwing competition. The winner averaged over 20'.

This is why I make Instructables, and most specifically why I made this one. I wanted it to be easy and cheap, no special hard to find parts, work well, while still being a real Trebuchet. I loved the comment.

Here it is:
My school hosts a regional competition for the National Science Bowl for high school students every year with the winner going on to the national competition in Washington, DC. This year I was in charge of finding some sort of competitive project for the teams to build and compete with during the lunch break. I chose your quick and dirty trebuchet and made a kit for each team. I made a few changes to your plans. I used 12" long 1/4" cut dowels instead of chopsticks since I didn't have a cheap source of chopsticks. I did not give them rubber bands and instead they were to tape the paperclips on for the axle. They were given a 200 g weight with a loop of string taped to it for the weight. The projectile was a mini binder clip with a loop of string tied to it. The complete kit contained the 9 dowels, a roll of masking tape, 4 paper clips, the 200g weight with loop of string attached, mini binder clip with loop of string attached, your printed instructions as a guide and a sheet explaining the rules of the competition.

It worked out quite well. The teams were given a copy of your plans as a guide and 20 minutes to build their device. The competition was they were to launch the projectile three times and it had to land inside a track 4 foot wide each time. The distances of the two best of the three throws were added together for their score with a foul (outside the lines) counting as zero distance. We had 12 teams participate and the winner had a score of about 44.5 feet. They all had fun and I think learned something too.

Picture of National Science Bowl teams used my Trebuchet for a competition