Need help with DMX512 to Analog 0-10VDC Decoder

I am looking to *update* some old strobe lights that my theater uses to be able to control them through our DMX control board.  They have 2 analog 0-10V inputs to control the flash rate and the intensity.  I am looking for the simplest solution as we do not have a lot of money to throw at this project.  I have some experience in electronics as well as working with arduino, but not enough to tackle this job by myself.   Any thoughts on this would be appreciated!  Attaching the control spec sheet.

Tom

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You could hack one of these LED drivers to do what you want.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9S...

Hard to say exactly how without the hardware in my hands, but, with minimal components (resistor, capacitor, diode) you can get a signal that behaves the way you want....for 15 bucks. ....

AJackOfAllTrades (author)  steveastrouk2 years ago

Hmm... was wondering about that myself as I had done some digging around on these as well. We do own some but they are 12VDC input and output. They put out a PWM signal. Now the question is how do I adjust the output voltage and get it to fade from 0-10VDC? I hooked one up and measured the voltage out as I ran the channel up and down. It is in the mV range when the channel is at 0, but immediately goes to 12V at 1%.

I am assuming that just a LM317 voltage regulator and the right Resistors to get a 10VDC output, but now about that 0-10VDC fade part. Ideas? Thanks for the feedback!

Well, may or may not be smarter than I thought. Just came across this:

...and this:

https://www.instructables.com/id/Analog-Output-Conv...

Would these (in theory) do a clean job of converting the signal?

Thanks again,

Tom

The Image I tried to paste above...

Using-Pwm-To-Generate-Analog-Output.jpg

If the frequency of the PWM is high enough, and the input resistance of the device you're driving is also pretty high (say >10k), then you can ditch the opamp. Put a 10V zener diode across the capacitor though to limit the output voltage.